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Community led active schools programme (CLASP) exploring the implementation of health interventions in primary schools: headteachers’ perspectives / Danielle Christian; Charlotte Todd; Helen Davies; Jaynie Rance; Gareth Stratton; Frances Rapport; Sinead Brophy

BMC Public Health, Volume: 15, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Rance, Jaynie

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Abstract

Translation of effective school based health interventions to the school setting can be problematic and it is imperative key challenges and facilitators of implementing health interventions be understood from a school’s perspective. This paper reports the findings from nineteen semi-structured inter...

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Published in: BMC Public Health
ISSN: 1471-2458
Published: 2015
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa20504
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Abstract: Translation of effective school based health interventions to the school setting can be problematic and it is imperative key challenges and facilitators of implementing health interventions be understood from a school’s perspective. This paper reports the findings from nineteen semi-structured interviews, conducted in primary schools (head teachers n = 16, deputy head teacher n = 1, healthy school co-ordinator n = 2). The key challenges for schools in implementing health interventions were; government-led academic priorities, initiative overload, low autonomy for schools, lack of staff support, lack of facilities and resources, litigation risk and parental engagement. Key staff working in primary schools Primary schools favoured child-centred and cross-curricular approaches, inclusive whole school approaches and assurances to be supportive of the school ethos. Recommendations to increase the application of interventions into the school setting included; better planning and organisation, greater collaboration with schools and external partners and elements addressing sustainability. The findings suggest that in order to improve implementation of interventions, schools should be involved in the developmental stage to ensure that interventions can be tailored to best suit each individual schools’ needs.
Keywords: Qualitative, Interviews, Headteachers, Health interventions, Physical activity, Primary
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 1