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Headteachers’ prior beliefs on child health and their engagement in school based health interventions: a qualitative study / Charlotte Todd; Danielle Christian; Helen Davies; Jaynie Rance; Gareth Stratton; Frances Rapport; Sinead Brophy

BMC Research Notes, Volume: 8, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Rance, Jaynie

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DOI (Published version): 10.1186/s13104-015-1091-2

Abstract

The prior beliefs of headteachers and school staff have not previously been considered in relation to the implementation of public health interventions. This study examined the views of primary school headteachers and school health co-ordinators regarding child health to assist in the design offutur...

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Published in: BMC Research Notes
Published: 2015
Online Access: http://10.1186/s13104-015-1091-2
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21237
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Abstract: The prior beliefs of headteachers and school staff have not previously been considered in relation to the implementation of public health interventions. This study examined the views of primary school headteachers and school health co-ordinators regarding child health to assist in the design offuture school-based health interventions. MethodsQualitative data was collected using semi-structured interviews with 19 headteachers, deputy headteachers and school health co-ordinators in the primary schools.. ResultsThere was considerable variance regarding the perceived health of pupils in primary schools and whether the school should take responsibility for addressing child health behaviours. Many participants believed that too much responsibility is being placed on schools for health promotion and a more integrated approach including school, parental and social elements is necessary. The importance of mental health was highlighted by participants and the need to incorporate measures of wellbeing into future school based health interventions is apparentConclusionThere appears to be a greater likelihood of school based interventions being adopted by staff if they perceive a health issues to be important among their pupils. In addition a better understanding of perceptions of responsibility for child health from school staff, parents and the wider community if child health issues are to be targeted in the design of interventions.
Keywords: Primary school; Qualitative; Headteacher; Children; Health; Beliefs
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 1