No Cover Image

Journal article 493 views

Early influences on child satiety-responsiveness: the role of weaning style / A. Brown; M. D. Lee

Pediatric Obesity, Volume: 10, Issue: 1, Pages: 57 - 66

Swansea University Author: Lee, Michelle

Full text not available from this repository: check for access using links below.

DOI (Published version): 10.1111/j.2047-6310.2013.00207.x

Abstract

Background: Nutrition during infancy may have a long-term impact upon weight gain and eating style.How infants are introduced to solid foods may be important. Traditionally, infants are introduced to solidfoods via spoon-feeding of purees. However, baby-led weaning advocates allowing infants to self...

Full description

Published in: Pediatric Obesity
Published: 2015
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21593
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2015-05-21T02:03:07Z
last_indexed 2018-02-09T04:59:19Z
id cronfa21593
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2017-08-31T13:29:46Z</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>21593</id><entry>2015-05-20</entry><title>Early influences on child satiety-responsiveness: the role of weaning style</title><alternativeTitle></alternativeTitle><author>Michelle Lee</author><firstname>Michelle</firstname><surname>Lee</surname><active>true</active><ORCID>0000-0002-1291-5895</ORCID><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent><sid>503d8657d47c066ada31f344b030c352</sid><email>0f75cba8cdba652eff19abe1f6b152f5</email><emailaddr>fVNxOUUOJ3rJn3pqiWuTw4JSbZF11mHm1K8NtCGVMYw=</emailaddr><date>2015-05-20</date><deptcode>HPS</deptcode><abstract>Background: Nutrition during infancy may have a long-term impact upon weight gain and eating style.How infants are introduced to solid foods may be important. Traditionally, infants are introduced to solidfoods via spoon-feeding of purees. However, baby-led weaning advocates allowing infants to self-feedfoods in their whole form. Advocates suggest this may promote healthy eating styles, but evidence issparse. The aim of the current study was to compare child eating behaviour at 18&#x2013;24 months betweeninfants weaned using a traditional weaning approach and those weaned using a baby-led weaning style.Methods: Two hundred ninety-eight mothers with an infant aged 18&#x2013;24 months completed a longitudinal,self-report questionnaire. In Phase One, mothers with an infant aged 6&#x2013;12 months reported breastfeedingduration, timing of solid foods, weaning style (baby-led or standard) and maternal control, measured usingthe Child Feeding Questionnaire. At 18&#x2013;24 months, post-partum mothers completed a follow-up questionnaireexamining child eating style (satiety-responsiveness, food-responsiveness, fussiness, enjoyment offood) and reported child weight.Results: Infants weaned using a baby-led approach were significantly more satiety-responsive and lesslikely to be overweight compared with those weaned using a standard approach. This was independent ofbreastfeeding duration, timing of introduction to complementary foods and maternal control.Conclusions: A baby-led weaning approach may encourage greater satiety-responsiveness and healthyweight-gain trajectories in infants. However, the limitations of a self-report correlational study are noted.Further research using randomized controlled trial is needed.</abstract><type>Journal article</type><journal>Pediatric Obesity</journal><volume>10</volume><journalNumber>1</journalNumber><paginationStart>57</paginationStart><paginationEnd>66</paginationEnd><publisher></publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint/><issnElectronic/><keywords>baby-led; child weight; satiety responsiveness; weaning</keywords><publishedDay>17</publishedDay><publishedMonth>12</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2015</publishedYear><publishedDate>2015-12-17</publishedDate><doi>10.1111/j.2047-6310.2013.00207.x</doi><url></url><notes></notes><college>College of Human and Health Sciences</college><department>Psychology</department><CollegeCode>CHHS</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>HPS</DepartmentCode><institution/><researchGroup>Nursing and Practice Development</researchGroup><supervisor/><sponsorsfunders>RCUK</sponsorsfunders><grantnumber/><degreelevel/><degreename>None</degreename><lastEdited>2017-08-31T13:29:46Z</lastEdited><Created>2015-05-20T07:18:26Z</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Psychology</level></path><authors><author><firstname>A.</firstname><surname>Brown</surname><orcid/><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>M. D.</firstname><surname>Lee</surname><orcid/><order>2</order></author></authors><documents/></rfc1807>
spelling 2017-08-31T13:29:46Z v2 21593 2015-05-20 Early influences on child satiety-responsiveness: the role of weaning style Michelle Lee Michelle Lee true 0000-0002-1291-5895 false 503d8657d47c066ada31f344b030c352 0f75cba8cdba652eff19abe1f6b152f5 fVNxOUUOJ3rJn3pqiWuTw4JSbZF11mHm1K8NtCGVMYw= 2015-05-20 HPS Background: Nutrition during infancy may have a long-term impact upon weight gain and eating style.How infants are introduced to solid foods may be important. Traditionally, infants are introduced to solidfoods via spoon-feeding of purees. However, baby-led weaning advocates allowing infants to self-feedfoods in their whole form. Advocates suggest this may promote healthy eating styles, but evidence issparse. The aim of the current study was to compare child eating behaviour at 18–24 months betweeninfants weaned using a traditional weaning approach and those weaned using a baby-led weaning style.Methods: Two hundred ninety-eight mothers with an infant aged 18–24 months completed a longitudinal,self-report questionnaire. In Phase One, mothers with an infant aged 6–12 months reported breastfeedingduration, timing of solid foods, weaning style (baby-led or standard) and maternal control, measured usingthe Child Feeding Questionnaire. At 18–24 months, post-partum mothers completed a follow-up questionnaireexamining child eating style (satiety-responsiveness, food-responsiveness, fussiness, enjoyment offood) and reported child weight.Results: Infants weaned using a baby-led approach were significantly more satiety-responsive and lesslikely to be overweight compared with those weaned using a standard approach. This was independent ofbreastfeeding duration, timing of introduction to complementary foods and maternal control.Conclusions: A baby-led weaning approach may encourage greater satiety-responsiveness and healthyweight-gain trajectories in infants. However, the limitations of a self-report correlational study are noted.Further research using randomized controlled trial is needed. Journal article Pediatric Obesity 10 1 57 66 baby-led; child weight; satiety responsiveness; weaning 17 12 2015 2015-12-17 10.1111/j.2047-6310.2013.00207.x College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology CHHS HPS Nursing and Practice Development RCUK None 2017-08-31T13:29:46Z 2015-05-20T07:18:26Z College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology A. Brown 1 M. D. Lee 2
title Early influences on child satiety-responsiveness: the role of weaning style
spellingShingle Early influences on child satiety-responsiveness: the role of weaning style
Lee, Michelle
title_short Early influences on child satiety-responsiveness: the role of weaning style
title_full Early influences on child satiety-responsiveness: the role of weaning style
title_fullStr Early influences on child satiety-responsiveness: the role of weaning style
title_full_unstemmed Early influences on child satiety-responsiveness: the role of weaning style
title_sort Early influences on child satiety-responsiveness: the role of weaning style
author_id_str_mv 503d8657d47c066ada31f344b030c352
author_id_fullname_str_mv 503d8657d47c066ada31f344b030c352_***_Lee, Michelle
author Lee, Michelle
author2 A. Brown
M. D. Lee
format Journal article
container_title Pediatric Obesity
container_volume 10
container_issue 1
container_start_page 57
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1111/j.2047-6310.2013.00207.x
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
document_store_str 0
active_str 1
researchgroup_str Nursing and Practice Development
description Background: Nutrition during infancy may have a long-term impact upon weight gain and eating style.How infants are introduced to solid foods may be important. Traditionally, infants are introduced to solidfoods via spoon-feeding of purees. However, baby-led weaning advocates allowing infants to self-feedfoods in their whole form. Advocates suggest this may promote healthy eating styles, but evidence issparse. The aim of the current study was to compare child eating behaviour at 18–24 months betweeninfants weaned using a traditional weaning approach and those weaned using a baby-led weaning style.Methods: Two hundred ninety-eight mothers with an infant aged 18–24 months completed a longitudinal,self-report questionnaire. In Phase One, mothers with an infant aged 6–12 months reported breastfeedingduration, timing of solid foods, weaning style (baby-led or standard) and maternal control, measured usingthe Child Feeding Questionnaire. At 18–24 months, post-partum mothers completed a follow-up questionnaireexamining child eating style (satiety-responsiveness, food-responsiveness, fussiness, enjoyment offood) and reported child weight.Results: Infants weaned using a baby-led approach were significantly more satiety-responsive and lesslikely to be overweight compared with those weaned using a standard approach. This was independent ofbreastfeeding duration, timing of introduction to complementary foods and maternal control.Conclusions: A baby-led weaning approach may encourage greater satiety-responsiveness and healthyweight-gain trajectories in infants. However, the limitations of a self-report correlational study are noted.Further research using randomized controlled trial is needed.
published_date 2015-12-17T04:14:50Z
_version_ 1625778594958540800
score 10.778831