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Understanding the relationship between breastfeeding and postnatal depression: the role of pain and physical difficulties / Amy Brown; Jaynie Rance; Paul Bennett

Journal of Advanced Nursing, Volume: 72, Issue: 2, Pages: 273 - 282

Swansea University Author: Rance, Jaynie

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/jan.12832

Abstract

The study aims to examine the relationship between mother's reasons for stopping breastfeeding and depressive symptoms in the postnatal period. Difficulty breastfeeding has been connected to postnatal depression although the direction of causality is unclear. However, the concept of ‘breastfeed...

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Published in: Journal of Advanced Nursing
ISSN: 03092402
Published: 2016
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa28094
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first_indexed 2016-05-20T01:19:10Z
last_indexed 2018-10-02T12:53:21Z
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spelling 2018-10-02T10:47:01Z v2 28094 2016-05-19 Understanding the relationship between breastfeeding and postnatal depression: the role of pain and physical difficulties Jaynie Rance Jaynie Rance true 0000-0002-9504-0675 false 14360f4993b452995fbc22db857cabf7 a66ae59c6294f7b216e49731d741944c vrR5Q5Rmhv8H5dWwx/ydSQgr5y2nBRz3haj4DmVVDsQ= 2016-05-19 HPP The study aims to examine the relationship between mother's reasons for stopping breastfeeding and depressive symptoms in the postnatal period. Difficulty breastfeeding has been connected to postnatal depression although the direction of causality is unclear. However, the concept of ‘breastfeeding difficulty’ is wide and includes biological, psychological and social factors. This study reports findings from a cross-sectional self-report survey. Data were collected between December 2012 and February 2013. 217 women with an infant aged 0-6 months who had started breastfeeding at birth but had stopped before 6 months old completed a questionnaire which asked about breastfeeding duration and reasons for stopping breastfeeding. respondents further completed a copy of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. A short breastfeeding duration and a variety of reasons for stopping breastfeeding were associated with higher depression score. Further regression analysis revealed only the specific reasons of stopping breastfeeding for physical difficulty and pain remained predictive of depression score.Conclusions. Understanding women’s specific reasons for stopping breastfeeding rather than breastfeeding duration is critical in understanding women’s breastfeeding experience and providing women with emotional support. Issues with pain and physical breastfeeding were most indicative of postnatal depression in comparison to psychosocial reasons highlighting the importance of spendingtime with new mothers to help them with issues such as latch. Journal article Journal of Advanced Nursing 72 2 273 282 03092402 breastfeeding, difficulty, formula feeding, health visiting, midwives, 1 2 2016 2016-02-01 10.1111/jan.12832 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jan.12832/epdf College of Human and Health Sciences Public Health and Policy Studies CHHS HPP Nursing and Practice Development None 2018-10-02T10:47:01Z 2016-05-19T14:47:11Z College of Human and Health Sciences Public Health and Policy Studies Amy Brown 1 Jaynie Rance 2 Paul Bennett 3
title Understanding the relationship between breastfeeding and postnatal depression: the role of pain and physical difficulties
spellingShingle Understanding the relationship between breastfeeding and postnatal depression: the role of pain and physical difficulties
Rance, Jaynie
title_short Understanding the relationship between breastfeeding and postnatal depression: the role of pain and physical difficulties
title_full Understanding the relationship between breastfeeding and postnatal depression: the role of pain and physical difficulties
title_fullStr Understanding the relationship between breastfeeding and postnatal depression: the role of pain and physical difficulties
title_full_unstemmed Understanding the relationship between breastfeeding and postnatal depression: the role of pain and physical difficulties
title_sort Understanding the relationship between breastfeeding and postnatal depression: the role of pain and physical difficulties
author_id_str_mv 14360f4993b452995fbc22db857cabf7
author_id_fullname_str_mv 14360f4993b452995fbc22db857cabf7_***_Rance, Jaynie
author Rance, Jaynie
author2 Amy Brown
Jaynie Rance
Paul Bennett
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Advanced Nursing
container_volume 72
container_issue 2
container_start_page 273
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
issn 03092402
doi_str_mv 10.1111/jan.12832
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Public Health and Policy Studies{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Public Health and Policy Studies
url http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jan.12832/epdf
document_store_str 0
active_str 1
researchgroup_str Nursing and Practice Development
description The study aims to examine the relationship between mother's reasons for stopping breastfeeding and depressive symptoms in the postnatal period. Difficulty breastfeeding has been connected to postnatal depression although the direction of causality is unclear. However, the concept of ‘breastfeeding difficulty’ is wide and includes biological, psychological and social factors. This study reports findings from a cross-sectional self-report survey. Data were collected between December 2012 and February 2013. 217 women with an infant aged 0-6 months who had started breastfeeding at birth but had stopped before 6 months old completed a questionnaire which asked about breastfeeding duration and reasons for stopping breastfeeding. respondents further completed a copy of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. A short breastfeeding duration and a variety of reasons for stopping breastfeeding were associated with higher depression score. Further regression analysis revealed only the specific reasons of stopping breastfeeding for physical difficulty and pain remained predictive of depression score.Conclusions. Understanding women’s specific reasons for stopping breastfeeding rather than breastfeeding duration is critical in understanding women’s breastfeeding experience and providing women with emotional support. Issues with pain and physical breastfeeding were most indicative of postnatal depression in comparison to psychosocial reasons highlighting the importance of spendingtime with new mothers to help them with issues such as latch.
published_date 2016-02-01T04:40:43Z
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score 10.867005