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High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy / Sean Davies; Spencer Jeffs; Robert Lancaster; Gavin Baxter

Materials, Volume: 10, Issue: 5, Start page: 457

Swansea University Author: Jeffs, Spencer

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/ma10050457

Abstract

The realisation of employing Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) technologies to produce components in the aerospace industry is significantly increasing. This can be attributed to their ability to offer the near-net shape fabrication of fully dense components with a high potential for geometrical op...

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Published in: Materials
ISSN: 1996-1944
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa33185
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Abstract: The realisation of employing Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) technologies to produce components in the aerospace industry is significantly increasing. This can be attributed to their ability to offer the near-net shape fabrication of fully dense components with a high potential for geometrical optimisation, all of which contribute to subsequent reductions in material wastage and component weight. However, the influence of this manufacturing route on the properties of aerospace alloys must first be fully understood before being actively applied in-service. Specimens from the nickel superalloy C263 have been manufactured using Powder Bed Direct Laser Deposition (PB-DLD), each with unique post-processing conditions. These variables include two build orientations, vertical and horizontal, and two different heat treatments. The effects of build orientation and post-process heat treatments on the materials’ mechanical properties have been assessed with the Small Punch Tensile (SPT) test technique, a practical test method given the limited availability of PB-DLD consolidated material. SPT testing was also conducted on a cast C263 variant to compare with PB-DLD derivatives. At both room and elevated temperature conditions, differences in mechanical performances arose between each material variant. This was found to be instigated by microstructural variations exposed through microscopic and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. SPT results were also compared with available uniaxial tensile data in terms of SPT peak and yield load against uniaxial ultimate tensile and yield strength.
Keywords: small punch; tensile; powder bed direct laser deposition; C263
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 5
Start Page: 457