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The effect of graphite and carbon black ratios on conductive ink performance / Chris Phillips; Awadh Al-Ahmadi; Sarah-Jane Potts; Tim Claypole; Davide Deganello

Journal of Materials Science, Volume: 52, Issue: 16, Pages: 9520 - 9530

Swansea University Author: Deganello, Davide

Abstract

Conductive inks based on graphite and carbon black are used in a host of applications including energy storage, energy harvesting, electrochemical sensors and printed heaters. This requires accurate control of electrical properties tailored to the application; ink formulation is a fundamental elemen...

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Published in: Journal of Materials Science
ISSN: 0022-2461 1573-4803
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa33694
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Abstract: Conductive inks based on graphite and carbon black are used in a host of applications including energy storage, energy harvesting, electrochemical sensors and printed heaters. This requires accurate control of electrical properties tailored to the application; ink formulation is a fundamental element of this. Data on how formulation relates to properties have tended to apply to only single types of conductor at any time, with data on mixed types of carbon only empirical thus far. Therefore, screen printable carbon inks with differing graphite, carbon black and vinyl polymer content were formulated and printed to establish the effect on rheology, deposition and conductivity. The study found that at a higher total carbon loading ink of 29.4% by mass, optimal conductivity (0.029 Ω cm) was achieved at a graphite to carbon black ratio of 2.6 to 1. For a lower total carbon loading (21.7 mass %), this ratio was reduced to 1.8 to 1. Formulation affected viscosity and hence ink transfer and also surface roughness due to retention of features from the screen printing mesh and the inherent roughness of the carbon components, as well as the ability of features to be reproduced consistently.
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 16
Start Page: 9520
End Page: 9530