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Weekend admission and mortality for gastrointestinal disorders across England and Wales / S. E. Roberts; T. H. Brown; K. Thorne; R. A. Lyons; A. Akbari; D. J. Napier; J. L. Brown; J. G. Williams

British Journal of Surgery, Volume: 104, Issue: 12, Pages: 1723 - 1734

Swansea University Author: Williams, John

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DOI (Published version): 10.1002/bjs.10608

Abstract

The aim was to establish whether gastrointestinal disorders are susceptible to increased mortality following unscheduled admission on weekends, compared with weekdays.Anonymised national administrative inpatient and mortality data for people in England and Wales who were hospitalized as an emergency...

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Published in: British Journal of Surgery
ISSN: 00071323
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa37574
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Abstract: The aim was to establish whether gastrointestinal disorders are susceptible to increased mortality following unscheduled admission on weekends, compared with weekdays.Anonymised national administrative inpatient and mortality data for people in England and Wales who were hospitalized as an emergency for one of 19 major GI disorders were linked and analysed.The study included 2 254 701 people in England and 155 464 in Wales. For 11 general surgical and medical GI disorders there were little, or no, significant weekend effects on mortality at 30 days in either country. There were large consistent weekend effects in both countries for severe liver disease (England: 26·2 (95 per cent c.i. 21·1 to 31·6) per cent; Wales: 32·0 (12·4 to 55·1 per cent) and GI cancer (England: 21·8 (19·1 to 24·5) per cent; Wales: 25·0 (15·0 to 35·9) per cent), which were lower in patients managed by surgeons. Admission rates were lower at weekends than on weekdays, most strongly for severe liver disease (by 43·3 per cent in England and 51·4 per cent in Wales) and GI cancer (by 44·6 and 52·8 per cent respectively). Both mortality and the weekend mortality effect for GI cancer were lower for patients managed by surgeons.There is little, or no, evidence of a weekend mortality effect for most major general surgical or medical GI disorders, but large weekend effects for GI cancer and severe liver disease. Lower admission rates at weekends indicate more severe cases. The findings for severe liver disease may suggest a lack of specialist hepatological resources. For cancers, reduced availability of end-of-life care in the community at weekends may be the cause.
Keywords: gastrointestinal disorders; data linkage; mortality; unscheduled admission; weekend effect
College: Swansea University Medical School
Issue: 12
Start Page: 1723
End Page: 1734