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Revisiting ``Hole in the Wall'' Computing: Private Smart Speakers and Public Slum Settings / Simon Robinson; Jennifer Pearson; Shashank Ahire; Rini Ahirwar; Bhakti Bhikne; Nimish Maravi; Matt Jones

Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Paper No. 498

Swansea University Author: Pearson, Jennifer

DOI (Published version): 10.1145/3173574.3174072

Abstract

Millions of homes worldwide enjoy access to digital content and services through smart speakers such as Amazon’s Echo and Google’s Home. Promotional materials and users’ own videos typically show homes that have many well-resourced rooms, with good power and data infrastructures. Over the last sever...

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Published in: Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Paper No. 498
Published: Montreal, QC, Canada CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2018
Online Access: https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3173574.3174072
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa39915
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spelling 2019-05-03T13:48:00Z v2 39915 2018-05-03 Revisiting ``Hole in the Wall'' Computing: Private Smart Speakers and Public Slum Settings Jennifer Pearson Jennifer Pearson true 0000-0002-1960-1012 false 6d662d9e2151b302ed384b243e2a802f 917cb68b4fd04fcc17b072da877870cc LkyO+6oqsRhjxJtA0r+dSggr5y2nBRz3haj4DmVVDsQ= 2018-05-03 SCS Millions of homes worldwide enjoy access to digital content and services through smart speakers such as Amazon’s Echo and Google’s Home. Promotional materials and users’ own videos typically show homes that have many well-resourced rooms, with good power and data infrastructures. Over the last several years, we have been working with slum communities in India, whose dwellings are usually very compact (one or two rooms), personal home WiFi is almost unheard of, power infrastructures are far less robust, and financial resources put such smart speakers out of individual household reach. In- spired by the “hole in the wall” internet-kiosk programme, we carried out workshops with slum inhabitants to uncover issues and opportunities for providing a smart-speaker-type device in public areas and passageways. We designed and deployed a simple probe that allowed passers-by to ask and receive an- swers to questions. In this paper, we present the findings of this work, and a design space for such devices in these settings. Conference contribution Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Paper No. 498 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Montreal, QC, Canada 0 4 2018 2018-04-01 10.1145/3173574.3174072 https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3173574.3174072 College of Science Computer Science CSCI SCS None 2019-05-03T13:48:00Z 2018-05-03T12:19:07Z College of Science Computer Science Simon Robinson 1 Jennifer Pearson 2 Shashank Ahire 3 Rini Ahirwar 4 Bhakti Bhikne 5 Nimish Maravi 6 Matt Jones 7 0039915-17052018130556.pdf 39915.pdf 2018-05-17T13:05:56Z Output 1207556 application/pdf VoR true Published to Cronfa 17/05/2018 2018-05-17T00:00:00 true eng
title Revisiting ``Hole in the Wall'' Computing: Private Smart Speakers and Public Slum Settings
spellingShingle Revisiting ``Hole in the Wall'' Computing: Private Smart Speakers and Public Slum Settings
Pearson, Jennifer
title_short Revisiting ``Hole in the Wall'' Computing: Private Smart Speakers and Public Slum Settings
title_full Revisiting ``Hole in the Wall'' Computing: Private Smart Speakers and Public Slum Settings
title_fullStr Revisiting ``Hole in the Wall'' Computing: Private Smart Speakers and Public Slum Settings
title_full_unstemmed Revisiting ``Hole in the Wall'' Computing: Private Smart Speakers and Public Slum Settings
title_sort Revisiting ``Hole in the Wall'' Computing: Private Smart Speakers and Public Slum Settings
author_id_str_mv 6d662d9e2151b302ed384b243e2a802f
author_id_fullname_str_mv 6d662d9e2151b302ed384b243e2a802f_***_Pearson, Jennifer
author Pearson, Jennifer
author2 Simon Robinson
Jennifer Pearson
Shashank Ahire
Rini Ahirwar
Bhakti Bhikne
Nimish Maravi
Matt Jones
format Conference contribution
container_title Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Paper No. 498
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1145/3173574.3174072
publisher CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Computer Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Computer Science
url https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3173574.3174072
document_store_str 1
active_str 1
description Millions of homes worldwide enjoy access to digital content and services through smart speakers such as Amazon’s Echo and Google’s Home. Promotional materials and users’ own videos typically show homes that have many well-resourced rooms, with good power and data infrastructures. Over the last several years, we have been working with slum communities in India, whose dwellings are usually very compact (one or two rooms), personal home WiFi is almost unheard of, power infrastructures are far less robust, and financial resources put such smart speakers out of individual household reach. In- spired by the “hole in the wall” internet-kiosk programme, we carried out workshops with slum inhabitants to uncover issues and opportunities for providing a smart-speaker-type device in public areas and passageways. We designed and deployed a simple probe that allowed passers-by to ask and receive an- swers to questions. In this paper, we present the findings of this work, and a design space for such devices in these settings.
published_date 2018-04-01T22:01:35Z
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score 10.837401