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Dynamic Walking Models to Understand Asymmetric Gait Characteristics / William G. Charles

Swansea University Author: Charles, William G.

DOI (Published version): 10.23889/Suthesis.48133

Abstract

Passive dynamic walking models remarkably predict gait behaviour such as walk-run transition speeds, preferred step length, stride frequencies and - with the inclusion of springs - ground reaction forces. Muscular or neurological conditions may lead to asymmetric walking characteristics that, in tur...

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Published: 2018
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Doctoral
Degree name: Ph.D
Supervisor: Ransing, Rajesh S
Sponsors / Funders: Engineering Research Network Wales
Grant number: NRN019
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa48133
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first_indexed 2019-01-10T14:00:57Z
last_indexed 2019-01-10T14:00:57Z
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spelling 2019-01-10T10:52:27Z v2 48133 2019-01-10 Dynamic Walking Models to Understand Asymmetric Gait Characteristics William G. Charles William G. Charles true true 24329fd1a72584fddfd04fae6a2d9f26 0bee47cfba87c684721e9f2a9458b9df SpqDnGGXh6JAjVftNuSnnxbHhpNGhK+ZEf+BVPcHSeI= 2019-01-10 EEN Passive dynamic walking models remarkably predict gait behaviour such as walk-run transition speeds, preferred step length, stride frequencies and - with the inclusion of springs - ground reaction forces. Muscular or neurological conditions may lead to asymmetric walking characteristics that, in turn, come with long term health risks. Gait analysis may be used to understand an individual patient’s conditions to help rehabilitate them. However, people adapt their kinematic and kinetic walking patterns so it can be hard to distinguish the effects of gait alterations such as inertial imbalance or injury. In this thesis a compass walking model with no active controllers is explored to understand the dynamics of gait. To help us interpret the effects of mass imbalance with a prosthetic foot or orthotic device, asymmetric loading conditions are investigated. A simple spring-mass walking model is used to explore the effects of altered touch-down angles and effective leg stiffness to see if these are used as strategies to alter the characteristics of gait. Results show that an asymmetric touch-down angle alters step length while retaining a symmetric stance time. A hybrid model is then derived with springs to emulate human-like ground reaction forces and asymmetric inertial loading of the legs. Results support previous research that push-off from the trailing leg propels the leg mass more than the body mass. Higher rates of joint forces, larger step lengths and a longer stance time on the residual limb may be due to the prosthetic leg stiffness or the higher location of centre-of-mass. These results help us understand how the dynamic components affect gait characteristics such as step length, stance time and walking speeds. This work is motivated by the needs of persons with disabilities and by the desire to understand human walking. E-Thesis 0 0 2018 2018-01-01 10.23889/Suthesis.48133 A selection of third party content is redacted or is partially redacted from this thesis. College of Engineering Engineering CENG EEN Swansea University Ransing, Rajesh S Engineering Research Network Wales NRN019 Doctoral Ph.D 2019-01-11T08:32:55Z 2019-01-10T10:38:10Z College of Engineering Engineering William G. Charles 1 0048133-10012019105227.pdf Charles_William_G_PhD_Final_Thesis_Redacted.pdf 2019-01-10T10:52:27Z Output 19964918 application/pdf ETRVOA true Published to Cronfa 10/01/2019 2019-01-09T00:00:00 true
title Dynamic Walking Models to Understand Asymmetric Gait Characteristics
spellingShingle Dynamic Walking Models to Understand Asymmetric Gait Characteristics
Charles, William G.
title_short Dynamic Walking Models to Understand Asymmetric Gait Characteristics
title_full Dynamic Walking Models to Understand Asymmetric Gait Characteristics
title_fullStr Dynamic Walking Models to Understand Asymmetric Gait Characteristics
title_full_unstemmed Dynamic Walking Models to Understand Asymmetric Gait Characteristics
title_sort Dynamic Walking Models to Understand Asymmetric Gait Characteristics
author_id_str_mv 24329fd1a72584fddfd04fae6a2d9f26
author_id_fullname_str_mv 24329fd1a72584fddfd04fae6a2d9f26_***_Charles, William G.
author Charles, William G.
author2 William G. Charles
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publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.23889/Suthesis.48133
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
document_store_str 1
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description Passive dynamic walking models remarkably predict gait behaviour such as walk-run transition speeds, preferred step length, stride frequencies and - with the inclusion of springs - ground reaction forces. Muscular or neurological conditions may lead to asymmetric walking characteristics that, in turn, come with long term health risks. Gait analysis may be used to understand an individual patient’s conditions to help rehabilitate them. However, people adapt their kinematic and kinetic walking patterns so it can be hard to distinguish the effects of gait alterations such as inertial imbalance or injury. In this thesis a compass walking model with no active controllers is explored to understand the dynamics of gait. To help us interpret the effects of mass imbalance with a prosthetic foot or orthotic device, asymmetric loading conditions are investigated. A simple spring-mass walking model is used to explore the effects of altered touch-down angles and effective leg stiffness to see if these are used as strategies to alter the characteristics of gait. Results show that an asymmetric touch-down angle alters step length while retaining a symmetric stance time. A hybrid model is then derived with springs to emulate human-like ground reaction forces and asymmetric inertial loading of the legs. Results support previous research that push-off from the trailing leg propels the leg mass more than the body mass. Higher rates of joint forces, larger step lengths and a longer stance time on the residual limb may be due to the prosthetic leg stiffness or the higher location of centre-of-mass. These results help us understand how the dynamic components affect gait characteristics such as step length, stance time and walking speeds. This work is motivated by the needs of persons with disabilities and by the desire to understand human walking.
published_date 2018-01-01T13:05:48Z
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score 10.801898