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Subjective Cognitive Impairment in 55-65-Year-Old Adults Is Associated with Negative Affective Symptoms, Neuroticism, and Poor Quality of Life / Amy Jenkins; Jeremy J. Tree; Ian M. Thornton; Andrea Tales

Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Volume: 67, Issue: 4, Pages: 1367 - 1378

Swansea University Author: Jenkins, Amy

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DOI (Published version): 10.3233/JAD-180810

Abstract

Although subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) is increasingly recognized clinically and in research as a riskfactor for mild cognitive impairment and dementia (particularly Alzheimer’s disease), it is etiologically heterogeneousand potentially treatable. Compared to mild cognitive impairment and Al...

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Published in: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
ISSN: 13872877 18758908
Published: IOS Press 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa49158
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spelling 2019-03-19T13:36:01Z v2 49158 2019-03-11 Subjective Cognitive Impairment in 55-65-Year-Old Adults Is Associated with Negative Affective Symptoms, Neuroticism, and Poor Quality of Life Amy Jenkins Amy Jenkins true 0000-0002-9126-4495 false 7d327b5d262d7e4bcd71dee2dcfba08c fccb6647dd4b16b4300ef61ddcf3fa5f Cc3bGDaCWVYFTCPmKkpHIggr5y2nBRz3haj4DmVVDsQ= 2019-03-11 CHHS Although subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) is increasingly recognized clinically and in research as a riskfactor for mild cognitive impairment and dementia (particularly Alzheimer’s disease), it is etiologically heterogeneousand potentially treatable. Compared to mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease, SCI however remains poorlycharacterized with debate continuing regarding its clinical relevance. The primary aim of this study was to improve thecharacterization of SCI within the general public by investigating functions sometimes omitted clinically or in research, namelyvisual attention-related information processing speed (RT) and its intra-individual variability (IIVRT), general cognition,depression, anxiety, memory, quality of life (QOL), and neuroticism. Compared to individuals without SCI, those with SCIwere more likely to reveal higher scores of anxiety, depression, and neuroticism and poorer perceived physical, psychological,and environmental QOL.Within-group analysis identified no significant relationships between any of the above variables forthe non-SCI group whereas for the SCI group, poorer Cognitive Change Index scores were significantly correlated with slowerRT, raised IIVRT, poorer memory, negative affective symptoms, higher neuroticism scores, and poorer QOL. This indicatesthat reports of perceived memory changes in SCI can also be associated with other characteristics, namely objectivelymeasured detrimental change in other aspects of brain function and behavior. This outcome emphasizes the importance ofa multi-function approach to characterizing and understanding SCI. Thus, although the effect of RT and IIVRT is not strongenough to differentiate SCI from non-SCI at group level, slowing and raised IIVRT do appear to characterize some peoplewith SCI. Journal article Journal of Alzheimer's Disease 67 4 1367 1378 IOS Press 13872877 18758908 Anxiety, dementia, depression, memory, neuroticism, quality of life, reaction time, subjective cognitive impairment, visual attention 19 2 2019 2019-02-19 10.3233/JAD-180810 College of Human and Health Sciences College CHHS CHHS Swansea University Centre for Innovative Ageing None 2019-03-19T13:36:01Z 2019-03-11T10:24:21Z College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Amy Jenkins 1 Jeremy J. Tree 2 Ian M. Thornton 3 Andrea Tales 4 0049158-19032019133450.pdf 49158.pdf 2019-03-19T13:34:50Z Output 452754 application/pdf VoR true Published to Cronfa 19/03/2019 2019-03-18T00:00:00 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (CC-BY-NC). true eng
title Subjective Cognitive Impairment in 55-65-Year-Old Adults Is Associated with Negative Affective Symptoms, Neuroticism, and Poor Quality of Life
spellingShingle Subjective Cognitive Impairment in 55-65-Year-Old Adults Is Associated with Negative Affective Symptoms, Neuroticism, and Poor Quality of Life
Jenkins, Amy
title_short Subjective Cognitive Impairment in 55-65-Year-Old Adults Is Associated with Negative Affective Symptoms, Neuroticism, and Poor Quality of Life
title_full Subjective Cognitive Impairment in 55-65-Year-Old Adults Is Associated with Negative Affective Symptoms, Neuroticism, and Poor Quality of Life
title_fullStr Subjective Cognitive Impairment in 55-65-Year-Old Adults Is Associated with Negative Affective Symptoms, Neuroticism, and Poor Quality of Life
title_full_unstemmed Subjective Cognitive Impairment in 55-65-Year-Old Adults Is Associated with Negative Affective Symptoms, Neuroticism, and Poor Quality of Life
title_sort Subjective Cognitive Impairment in 55-65-Year-Old Adults Is Associated with Negative Affective Symptoms, Neuroticism, and Poor Quality of Life
author_id_str_mv 7d327b5d262d7e4bcd71dee2dcfba08c
author_id_fullname_str_mv 7d327b5d262d7e4bcd71dee2dcfba08c_***_Jenkins, Amy
author Jenkins, Amy
author2 Amy Jenkins
Jeremy J. Tree
Ian M. Thornton
Andrea Tales
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
container_volume 67
container_issue 4
container_start_page 1367
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 13872877
18758908
doi_str_mv 10.3233/JAD-180810
publisher IOS Press
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
document_store_str 1
active_str 1
researchgroup_str Centre for Innovative Ageing
description Although subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) is increasingly recognized clinically and in research as a riskfactor for mild cognitive impairment and dementia (particularly Alzheimer’s disease), it is etiologically heterogeneousand potentially treatable. Compared to mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease, SCI however remains poorlycharacterized with debate continuing regarding its clinical relevance. The primary aim of this study was to improve thecharacterization of SCI within the general public by investigating functions sometimes omitted clinically or in research, namelyvisual attention-related information processing speed (RT) and its intra-individual variability (IIVRT), general cognition,depression, anxiety, memory, quality of life (QOL), and neuroticism. Compared to individuals without SCI, those with SCIwere more likely to reveal higher scores of anxiety, depression, and neuroticism and poorer perceived physical, psychological,and environmental QOL.Within-group analysis identified no significant relationships between any of the above variables forthe non-SCI group whereas for the SCI group, poorer Cognitive Change Index scores were significantly correlated with slowerRT, raised IIVRT, poorer memory, negative affective symptoms, higher neuroticism scores, and poorer QOL. This indicatesthat reports of perceived memory changes in SCI can also be associated with other characteristics, namely objectivelymeasured detrimental change in other aspects of brain function and behavior. This outcome emphasizes the importance ofa multi-function approach to characterizing and understanding SCI. Thus, although the effect of RT and IIVRT is not strongenough to differentiate SCI from non-SCI at group level, slowing and raised IIVRT do appear to characterize some peoplewith SCI.
published_date 2019-02-19T06:21:35Z
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