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Machine Learning as a universal tool for quantitative investigations of phase transitions / Cinzia Giannetti; Biagio Lucini; Davide Vadacchino

Nuclear Physics B, Volume: 944, Start page: 114639

Swansea University Author: Giannetti, Cinzia

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Abstract

The problem of identifying the phase of a given system for a certain value of the temperature can be reformulated as a classification problem in Machine Learning. Taking as a prototype the Ising model and using the Support Vector Machine as a tool to classify Monte Carlo generated configurations, we...

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Published in: Nuclear Physics B
ISSN: 0550-3213
Published: 2019
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa50404
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Abstract: The problem of identifying the phase of a given system for a certain value of the temperature can be reformulated as a classification problem in Machine Learning. Taking as a prototype the Ising model and using the Support Vector Machine as a tool to classify Monte Carlo generated configurations, we show that the critical region of the system can be clearly identified and the symmetry that drives the transition can be reconstructed from the performance of the learning process. The role of the discrete symmetry of the system in obtaining this result is discussed. A finite size analysis of the learned Support Vector Machine decision function allows us to determine the critical temperature and critical exponents with a precision that is comparable to that of the most efficient numerical approaches relying on a known Hamiltonian description of the system. For the determination of the critical temperature and of the critical exponent connected with the divergence of the correlation length, other than the availability of a range of temperatures having information on both phases, the method we propose does not rest on any physical input on the system, and in particular is agnostic to its Hamiltonian, its symmetry properties and its order parameter. Hence, our investigation provides a first significant step in the direction of devising robust tools for quantitative analyses of phase transitions in cases in which an order parameter is not known.
College: College of Engineering
Start Page: 114639