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Recent Advances on Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Organic Disinfection Byproducts in Water / Wei Zhang; Lue Wang; Yuesuo Yang; Paul Gaskin; Kar Seng Teng

ACS Sensors, Volume: 4, Issue: 5, Pages: 1138 - 1150

Swansea University Author: Zhang, Wei

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Abstract

Irreversible organ damage or even death frequently occurs when humans or animals unknowingly drink contaminated water. Therefore, in many countries drinking water is disinfected to ensure removal of harmful pathogens from drinking water. If upstream water treatment prior to disinfection is not adequ...

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Published in: ACS Sensors
ISSN: 2379-3694 2379-3694
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa50781
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Abstract: Irreversible organ damage or even death frequently occurs when humans or animals unknowingly drink contaminated water. Therefore, in many countries drinking water is disinfected to ensure removal of harmful pathogens from drinking water. If upstream water treatment prior to disinfection is not adequate, disinfection byproducts (DBPs) can be formed. DBPs can exist as wide variety of compounds, but up until now, only several typical compounds have drinking water standards attributed to them. However, it is apparent that the range of DBPs present in water can comprise hundreds of compounds, some of which are at high enough concentrations to be toxic or potentially carcinogenic. Hence, it becomes increasingly significant and urgent to develop an accessible, affordable, and durable sensing platform for a broader range and more sensitive detection of DBPs. Compared with well-established laboratory detection techniques, electrochemical sensing has been identified as a promising alternative that will provide rapid, affordable, and sensitive DBP monitoring in remote water sources. Therefore, this Review covers current state-of-the-art development (within the past decade) in electrochemical sensing to detect organic DBPs in water, which covered three major aspects: (1) recognition mechanism, (2) electrodes with signal amplification, and (3) signal read-out techniques. Moreover, comprehensive quality assessments on electrochemical biosensors, including linear detection range, limit of detection (LoD) and recovery, have also been summarized.
Keywords: electrochemical, sensors, disinfection byproducts, haloacetic acids, trihalomethanes, nitrosamines, water quality, water monitoring
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 5
Start Page: 1138
End Page: 1150