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Estimates for energy expenditure in free‐living animals using acceleration proxies; a reappraisal / Rory P Wilson; Luca Börger; Mark D. Holton; D. Michael Scantlebury; Agustina Gómez‐Laich; Flavio Quintana; Frank Rosell; Patricia M. Graf; Hannah Williams; Richard Gunner; Lloyd Hopkins; Nikki Marks; Nathan R. Geraldi; Carlos M. Duarte; Rebecca Scott; Michael S. Strano; Hermina Robotka; Christophe Eizaguirre; Andreas Fahlman; Emily L. C. Shepard

Journal of Animal Ecology

Swansea University Author: Borger, Luca

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 7th June 2020

Abstract

1.It is fundamentally important for many animal ecologists to quantify the costs of animal activities, although it is not straightforward to do so. The recording of triaxial acceleration by animal‐attached devices has been proposed as a way forward for this, with the specific suggestion that dynamic...

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Published in: Journal of Animal Ecology
ISSN: 0021-8790 1365-2656
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa50801
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The recording of triaxial acceleration by animal&#x2010;attached devices has been proposed as a way forward for this, with the specific suggestion that dynamic body acceleration (DBA) be used as a proxy for movement&#x2010;based power.2.DBA has now been validated frequently, both in the laboratory and in the field, although the literature still shows that some aspects of DBA theory and practice are misunderstood. Here we examine the theory behind DBA and employ modelling approaches to assess factors that affect the link between DBA and energy expenditure, from the deployment of the tag, through to the calibration of DBA with energy use in laboratory and field settings.3.Using data from a range of species and movement modes, we illustrate that vectorial and additive DBA metrics are proportional to each&#x2010;other. 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spelling 2019-06-17T11:58:52Z v2 50801 2019-06-11 Estimates for energy expenditure in free‐living animals using acceleration proxies; a reappraisal Luca Borger Luca Borger true 0000-0001-8763-5997 false 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2 be657dee57d87983ff5a094becb4144d KrNKIcwalNUkyxqMTsbkl9yvqZQRJmUl2lxhnzSZE7o= 2019-06-11 SBI 1.It is fundamentally important for many animal ecologists to quantify the costs of animal activities, although it is not straightforward to do so. The recording of triaxial acceleration by animal‐attached devices has been proposed as a way forward for this, with the specific suggestion that dynamic body acceleration (DBA) be used as a proxy for movement‐based power.2.DBA has now been validated frequently, both in the laboratory and in the field, although the literature still shows that some aspects of DBA theory and practice are misunderstood. Here we examine the theory behind DBA and employ modelling approaches to assess factors that affect the link between DBA and energy expenditure, from the deployment of the tag, through to the calibration of DBA with energy use in laboratory and field settings.3.Using data from a range of species and movement modes, we illustrate that vectorial and additive DBA metrics are proportional to each‐other. Either can be used as a proxy for energy, and summed to estimate total energy expended over a given period, or divided by time to give a proxy for movement‐related metabolic power. Nonetheless, we highlight how the ability of DBA to predict metabolic rate declines as the contribution of non‐movement related factors, such as heat production, increases.4.Overall, DBA seems to be a substantive proxy for movement‐based power but consideration of other movement‐related metrics, such as the Static Body Acceleration and the rate of change of body pitch and roll, may enable researchers to refine movement‐based metabolic costs, particularly in animals where movement is not characterized by marked changes in body acceleration. Journal article Journal of Animal Ecology 0021-8790 1365-2656 Dynamic Body Acceleration, DBA, doubly labelled water, energy expenditure, movement costs, wild animals, 0 0 2019 2019-01-01 10.1111/1365-2656.13040 https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1365-2656.13040 College of Science Biosciences CSCI SBI Swansea Lab for Animal Movement None 2019-06-17T11:58:52Z 2019-06-11T14:57:23Z College of Science Biosciences Rory P Wilson 1 Luca Börger 2 Mark D. Holton 3 D. Michael Scantlebury 4 Agustina Gómez‐Laich 5 Flavio Quintana 6 Frank Rosell 7 Patricia M. Graf 8 Hannah Williams 9 Richard Gunner 10 Lloyd Hopkins 11 Nikki Marks 12 Nathan R. Geraldi 13 Carlos M. Duarte 14 Rebecca Scott 15 Michael S. Strano 16 Hermina Robotka 17 Christophe Eizaguirre 18 Andreas Fahlman 19 Emily L. C. Shepard 20 Under embargo Under embargo 2019-06-17T11:58:30Z Output 4611841 application/pdf AM true Published to Cronfa 17/06/2019 2020-06-07T00:00:00 true eng
title Estimates for energy expenditure in free‐living animals using acceleration proxies; a reappraisal
spellingShingle Estimates for energy expenditure in free‐living animals using acceleration proxies; a reappraisal
Borger, Luca
title_short Estimates for energy expenditure in free‐living animals using acceleration proxies; a reappraisal
title_full Estimates for energy expenditure in free‐living animals using acceleration proxies; a reappraisal
title_fullStr Estimates for energy expenditure in free‐living animals using acceleration proxies; a reappraisal
title_full_unstemmed Estimates for energy expenditure in free‐living animals using acceleration proxies; a reappraisal
title_sort Estimates for energy expenditure in free‐living animals using acceleration proxies; a reappraisal
author_id_str_mv 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2_***_Borger, Luca
author Borger, Luca
author2 Rory P Wilson
Luca Börger
Mark D. Holton
D. Michael Scantlebury
Agustina Gómez‐Laich
Flavio Quintana
Frank Rosell
Patricia M. Graf
Hannah Williams
Richard Gunner
Lloyd Hopkins
Nikki Marks
Nathan R. Geraldi
Carlos M. Duarte
Rebecca Scott
Michael S. Strano
Hermina Robotka
Christophe Eizaguirre
Andreas Fahlman
Emily L. C. Shepard
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Animal Ecology
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 0021-8790
1365-2656
doi_str_mv 10.1111/1365-2656.13040
college_str College of Science
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
url https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1365-2656.13040
document_store_str 0
active_str 1
researchgroup_str Swansea Lab for Animal Movement
description 1.It is fundamentally important for many animal ecologists to quantify the costs of animal activities, although it is not straightforward to do so. The recording of triaxial acceleration by animal‐attached devices has been proposed as a way forward for this, with the specific suggestion that dynamic body acceleration (DBA) be used as a proxy for movement‐based power.2.DBA has now been validated frequently, both in the laboratory and in the field, although the literature still shows that some aspects of DBA theory and practice are misunderstood. Here we examine the theory behind DBA and employ modelling approaches to assess factors that affect the link between DBA and energy expenditure, from the deployment of the tag, through to the calibration of DBA with energy use in laboratory and field settings.3.Using data from a range of species and movement modes, we illustrate that vectorial and additive DBA metrics are proportional to each‐other. Either can be used as a proxy for energy, and summed to estimate total energy expended over a given period, or divided by time to give a proxy for movement‐related metabolic power. Nonetheless, we highlight how the ability of DBA to predict metabolic rate declines as the contribution of non‐movement related factors, such as heat production, increases.4.Overall, DBA seems to be a substantive proxy for movement‐based power but consideration of other movement‐related metrics, such as the Static Body Acceleration and the rate of change of body pitch and roll, may enable researchers to refine movement‐based metabolic costs, particularly in animals where movement is not characterized by marked changes in body acceleration.
published_date 2019-01-01T22:27:48Z
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score 10.837508