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Detered by debt? Young people, schools and the escalating costs of UK higher education. / Ceryn Evans

Journal of Youth Studies, Volume: 21, Issue: 9, Pages: 1267 - 1282

Swansea University Author: Evans, Ceryn

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Abstract

Popular commentaries lament that reforms to the financing ofHigher Education (HE) in the UK will operate as a significantdeterrent to HE participation amongst students from lessadvantaged backgrounds. This view of debt as a deterrent ispowerful and exists not only at a societal level, but also, as w...

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Published in: Journal of Youth Studies
ISSN: 1367-6261 1469-9680
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa50923
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first_indexed 2019-06-25T20:22:17Z
last_indexed 2019-07-10T15:37:30Z
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spelling 2019-07-10T10:27:15Z v2 50923 2019-06-25 Detered by debt? Young people, schools and the escalating costs of UK higher education. Ceryn Evans Ceryn Evans true 0000-0002-0019-1017 false 8667761b1ae1cf33956bb056c4367452 8513cbdb82e7e54b56d1a6fa9a1d7f82 TlWOTmprJlqkQ4tWRXmN4RXCE6Z9OGBXOD9D5JU4+T4= 2019-06-25 EDUC Popular commentaries lament that reforms to the financing ofHigher Education (HE) in the UK will operate as a significantdeterrent to HE participation amongst students from lessadvantaged backgrounds. This view of debt as a deterrent ispowerful and exists not only at a societal level, but also, as weshow, is present in schools. Our data reveal, however, that these‘debt commentaries’ play out very differently across schoolsaccording to the nature of their catchment and the sorts of viewsstaff hold about pupils in relation to their fear of debt.Furthermore, students’ views on debt largely contradict thesepopular ‘debt-as-deterrent’ narratives and instead are oftencharacterised by acceptance, ambivalence and at times positiveorientations towards the prospect of debt. These findings vividlyilluminate both the regional and institutional specificity of staffand student decision making in relation to ‘debt’, hence they havesubstantial implications for HE funding policy specifically anddebates about widening participation in HE more generally, whereensuring greater equity in the scope of choices young peoplehave when it comes to choosing a university is a pressing concern. Journal article Journal of Youth Studies 21 9 1267 1282 1367-6261 1469-9680 yonug people, higher education, debt, discourse 11 4 2018 2018-04-11 10.1080/13676261.2018.1461815 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13676261.2018.1461815 College of Arts and Humanities School of Education CAAH EDUC None None 2019-07-10T10:27:15Z 2019-06-25T15:43:42Z College of Arts and Humanities School of Education Ceryn Evans 1 0050923-10072019102533.pdf 50923.pdf 2019-07-10T10:25:33Z Output 1438256 application/pdf VoR true Published to Cronfa 10/07/2019 2019-07-09T00:00:00 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng
title Detered by debt? Young people, schools and the escalating costs of UK higher education.
spellingShingle Detered by debt? Young people, schools and the escalating costs of UK higher education.
Evans, Ceryn
title_short Detered by debt? Young people, schools and the escalating costs of UK higher education.
title_full Detered by debt? Young people, schools and the escalating costs of UK higher education.
title_fullStr Detered by debt? Young people, schools and the escalating costs of UK higher education.
title_full_unstemmed Detered by debt? Young people, schools and the escalating costs of UK higher education.
title_sort Detered by debt? Young people, schools and the escalating costs of UK higher education.
author_id_str_mv 8667761b1ae1cf33956bb056c4367452
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8667761b1ae1cf33956bb056c4367452_***_Evans, Ceryn
author Evans, Ceryn
author2 Ceryn Evans
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Youth Studies
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publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 1367-6261
1469-9680
doi_str_mv 10.1080/13676261.2018.1461815
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
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department_str School of Education{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}School of Education
url https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13676261.2018.1461815
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description Popular commentaries lament that reforms to the financing ofHigher Education (HE) in the UK will operate as a significantdeterrent to HE participation amongst students from lessadvantaged backgrounds. This view of debt as a deterrent ispowerful and exists not only at a societal level, but also, as weshow, is present in schools. Our data reveal, however, that these‘debt commentaries’ play out very differently across schoolsaccording to the nature of their catchment and the sorts of viewsstaff hold about pupils in relation to their fear of debt.Furthermore, students’ views on debt largely contradict thesepopular ‘debt-as-deterrent’ narratives and instead are oftencharacterised by acceptance, ambivalence and at times positiveorientations towards the prospect of debt. These findings vividlyilluminate both the regional and institutional specificity of staffand student decision making in relation to ‘debt’, hence they havesubstantial implications for HE funding policy specifically anddebates about widening participation in HE more generally, whereensuring greater equity in the scope of choices young peoplehave when it comes to choosing a university is a pressing concern.
published_date 2018-04-11T22:27:47Z
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