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The Effect of Hypo-Hydration on Mood and Cognition Is Influenced by Electrolyte in a Drink and Its Colour: A Randomised Trial / Alecia L. Cousins; Hayley A. Young; Andrew G. Thomas; David Benton

Nutrients, Volume: 11, Issue: 9, Start page: 2002

Swansea University Author: Benton, David

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/nu11092002

Abstract

Traditionally, it has been thought necessary to lose 2% of body mass due to dehydration todisrupt functioning, although recently, adverse effects have been reported, with a loss of 0.5%–0.7%.It is, however, unclear whether the response to small reductions in mass reflects dehydration ashomeostatic m...

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Published in: Nutrients
ISSN: 2072-6643
Published: www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/11/9/2002/pdf Open access MDPI 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51625
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Abstract: Traditionally, it has been thought necessary to lose 2% of body mass due to dehydration todisrupt functioning, although recently, adverse effects have been reported, with a loss of 0.5%–0.7%.It is, however, unclear whether the response to small reductions in mass reflects dehydration ashomeostatic mechanisms are thought to be effective. As psychological responses are most commonlyreported, it is strange that the possibility of a placebo response has not been considered. Individualswere therefore subject to a temperature of 30◦C for three hours, and mood and cognition weremonitored. To consider changes in hydration status, drinks were compared, differing in their abilityto rehydrate due to the presence or absence of electrolytes. The possibility of a placebo responsewas considered by comparing the response to plain or coloured water. Not drinking was disruptive,although a combination of plain water and electrolyte tended to be the most effective means ofpreventing a decline in mood, indicating a role for rehydration after a loss of 0.66% body mass. Therewas, however, also evidence of a placebo response: a combination of plain water and electrolytetended to be better able to prevent a decline in mood than coloured water and electrolyte.
Keywords: anxiety; cognition; colour of drink; dehydration; electrolyte; fluid intake; mood;
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 9
Start Page: 2002