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Effect of sampling rate on acceleration and counts of hip- and wrist-worn ActiGraph accelerometers in children / Kimberly A Clevenger; Karin A Pfeiffer; Kelly A Mackintosh; Melitta A McNarry; Jan Brønd; Daniel Arvidsson; Alexander H K Montoye

Physiological Measurement, Volume: 40, Issue: 9, Start page: 095008

Swansea University Author: McNarry, Melitta

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 13th September 2020

Abstract

Sampling rate (Hz) of ActiGraph accelerometers may affect processing of acceleration to activity counts when using a hip-worn monitor, but research is needed to quantify if sampling rate affects actual acceleration (mg's), when using wrist-worn accelerometers and during non-locomotive activitie...

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Published in: Physiological Measurement
ISSN: 1361-6579
Published: 2019
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa52105
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Abstract: Sampling rate (Hz) of ActiGraph accelerometers may affect processing of acceleration to activity counts when using a hip-worn monitor, but research is needed to quantify if sampling rate affects actual acceleration (mg's), when using wrist-worn accelerometers and during non-locomotive activities. Objective: To assess the effect of ActiGraph sampling rate on total counts/15-sec and mean acceleration and to compare differences due to sampling rate between accelerometer wear locations and across different types of activities. Approach: Children (n=29) wore a hip- and wrist-worn accelerometer (sampled at 100 Hz, downsampled in MATLAB to 30 Hz) during rest/transition periods, active video games, and a treadmill test to volitional exhaustion. Mean acceleration and counts/15-sec were computed for each axis and as vector magnitude. Main Results: There were mostly no significant differences in mean acceleration. However, 100 Hz data resulted in significantly more total counts/15-sec (mean bias 4-43 counts/15-sec across axes) for both the hip- and wrist-worn monitor when compared to 30 Hz data. Absolute differences increased with activity intensity (hip: r=0.46-0.63; wrist: r=0.26-0.55) and were greater for hip- versus wrist-worn monitors. Percent agreement between 100 and 30 Hz data was high (97.4-99.7%) when cut-points or machine learning algorithms were used to classify activity intensity. Significance: Our findings support that sampling rate affects the generation of counts but adds that differences increase with intensity and when using hip-worn monitors. We recommend researchers be consistent and vigilantly report the sampling rate used, but note that classifying data into activity intensities resulted in agreement despite differences in sampling rate.
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 9
Start Page: 095008