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Oxygen Isotope Dendrochronology of the Newport Medieval Ship

Nigel Nayling Orcid Logo, Neil Loader Orcid Logo, Roderick J. Bale Orcid Logo, Darren Davies, Danny McCarroll, Valérie Daux Orcid Logo

International Journal of Nautical Archaeology, Pages: 1 - 9

Swansea University Authors: Neil Loader Orcid Logo, Darren Davies, Danny McCarroll

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Abstract

Since the discovery of the Newport Medieval Ship in 2002, many studies have tried to establish a chronology for its construction and subsequent abandonment. Whilst conventional ring-width dendrochronology has been able to identify the provenance and provide a terminus post quem for the ship, until n...

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Published in: International Journal of Nautical Archaeology
ISSN: 1057-2414 1095-9270
Published: Informa UK Limited
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa65147
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Abstract: Since the discovery of the Newport Medieval Ship in 2002, many studies have tried to establish a chronology for its construction and subsequent abandonment. Whilst conventional ring-width dendrochronology has been able to identify the provenance and provide a terminus post quem for the ship, until now a felling date for timbers associated with the original construction of the vessel has proved elusive. This study reports results from the application of stable isotope dendrochronology to date timbers from the ship. Using a combination of dendrochronologically-dated timbers and stable oxygen isotopic data from dated and undated samples, we can provide an independent verification of the ring-width dendrochronology and to return the first felling dates for an assemblage of the ship’s framing timbers. Our results indicate that the ship was likely constructed shortly after the winter of AD 1457/8 with an operational lifetime of less than a decade. The study highlights the potential for the use of stable isotope dendrochronology for the precise, absolute dating of archaeological ship remains where ring-width dendrochronology alone has not proved effective.
Keywords: Oak, Quercus, Newport Medieval Ship, stable isotope dendrochronology, tree ring
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: This work was supported by the UKRI Frontiers under grant EP/X025098/1; Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (Canada) 895-2019-1015; ScoreCymru SC23007 and Wales Innovation Network under grant [WIN_UWT2].
Start Page: 1
End Page: 9