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Impairment in the recognition of emotion across different media following traumatic brain injury / Claire Williams; Rodger Wood

Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Volume: 32, Issue: 2, Pages: 113 - 122

Swansea University Authors: Claire, Williams, Rodger, Wood

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Abstract

<p>The current study examined emotion recognition following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and examined whether performance differed according to the affective valence and type of media presentation of the stimuli. A total of 64 patients with TBI and matched controls completed the Emotion Evalua...

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Published in: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
ISSN: 1380-3395 1744-411X
Published: Taylor and Francis 2009
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6742
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2013-06-12T14:43:13.2149024</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>6742</id><entry>2012-01-23</entry><title>Impairment in the recognition of emotion across different media following traumatic brain injury</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>21dc2ebf100cf324becc27e8db6fde8d</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-0791-744X</ORCID><firstname>Claire</firstname><surname>Williams</surname><name>Claire Williams</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>7d67e475699a3b3ab820b4a5d2602dc9</sid><firstname>Rodger</firstname><surname>Wood</surname><name>Rodger Wood</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2012-01-23</date><deptcode>HPS</deptcode><abstract>&lt;p&gt;The current study examined emotion recognition following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and examined whether performance differed according to the affective valence and type of media presentation of the stimuli. A total of 64 patients with TBI and matched controls completed the Emotion Evaluation Test (EET) and Ekman 60 Faces Test (E-60-FT). Patients with TBI also completed measures of information processing and verbal ability. Results revealed that the TBI group were significantly impaired compared to controls when recognizing emotion on the EET and E-60-FT. A significant main effect of valence was found in both groups, with poor recognition of negative emotions. However, the difference between the recognition of positive and negative emotions was larger in the TBI group. The TBI group were also more accurate recognizing emotion displayed in audiovisual media (EET) than that displayed in still media (E-60-FT). No significant relationship was obtained between emotion recognition tasks and information-processing speed. A significant positive relationship was found between the E-60-FT and one measure of verbal ability. These findings support models of emotion that specify separate neurological pathways for certain emotions and different media and confirm that patients with TBI are vulnerable to experiencing emotion recognition difficulties.&lt;/p&gt;</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology</journal><volume>32</volume><journalNumber>2</journalNumber><paginationStart>113</paginationStart><paginationEnd>122</paginationEnd><publisher>Taylor and Francis</publisher><placeOfPublication/><issnPrint>1380-3395</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1744-411X</issnElectronic><keywords>Traumatic Brain Injury; Emotion Recognition; Affective Valence; Cognitive Tests; media Presentation</keywords><publishedDay>29</publishedDay><publishedMonth>5</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2009</publishedYear><publishedDate>2009-05-29</publishedDate><doi>10.1080/13803390902806543</doi><url>http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13803390902806543</url><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Psychology</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>HPS</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><lastEdited>2013-06-12T14:43:13.2149024</lastEdited><Created>2012-01-23T15:32:15.3330000</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Psychology</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Claire</firstname><surname>Williams</surname><orcid>0000-0002-0791-744X</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Rodger</firstname><surname>Wood</surname><order>2</order></author></authors><documents/><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2013-06-12T14:43:13.2149024 v2 6742 2012-01-23 Impairment in the recognition of emotion across different media following traumatic brain injury 21dc2ebf100cf324becc27e8db6fde8d 0000-0002-0791-744X Claire Williams Claire Williams true false 7d67e475699a3b3ab820b4a5d2602dc9 Rodger Wood Rodger Wood true false 2012-01-23 HPS <p>The current study examined emotion recognition following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and examined whether performance differed according to the affective valence and type of media presentation of the stimuli. A total of 64 patients with TBI and matched controls completed the Emotion Evaluation Test (EET) and Ekman 60 Faces Test (E-60-FT). Patients with TBI also completed measures of information processing and verbal ability. Results revealed that the TBI group were significantly impaired compared to controls when recognizing emotion on the EET and E-60-FT. A significant main effect of valence was found in both groups, with poor recognition of negative emotions. However, the difference between the recognition of positive and negative emotions was larger in the TBI group. The TBI group were also more accurate recognizing emotion displayed in audiovisual media (EET) than that displayed in still media (E-60-FT). No significant relationship was obtained between emotion recognition tasks and information-processing speed. A significant positive relationship was found between the E-60-FT and one measure of verbal ability. These findings support models of emotion that specify separate neurological pathways for certain emotions and different media and confirm that patients with TBI are vulnerable to experiencing emotion recognition difficulties.</p> Journal Article Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 32 2 113 122 Taylor and Francis 1380-3395 1744-411X Traumatic Brain Injury; Emotion Recognition; Affective Valence; Cognitive Tests; media Presentation 29 5 2009 2009-05-29 10.1080/13803390902806543 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13803390902806543 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University 2013-06-12T14:43:13.2149024 2012-01-23T15:32:15.3330000 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Claire Williams 0000-0002-0791-744X 1 Rodger Wood 2
title Impairment in the recognition of emotion across different media following traumatic brain injury
spellingShingle Impairment in the recognition of emotion across different media following traumatic brain injury
Claire, Williams
Rodger, Wood
title_short Impairment in the recognition of emotion across different media following traumatic brain injury
title_full Impairment in the recognition of emotion across different media following traumatic brain injury
title_fullStr Impairment in the recognition of emotion across different media following traumatic brain injury
title_full_unstemmed Impairment in the recognition of emotion across different media following traumatic brain injury
title_sort Impairment in the recognition of emotion across different media following traumatic brain injury
author_id_str_mv 21dc2ebf100cf324becc27e8db6fde8d
7d67e475699a3b3ab820b4a5d2602dc9
author_id_fullname_str_mv 21dc2ebf100cf324becc27e8db6fde8d_***_Claire, Williams
7d67e475699a3b3ab820b4a5d2602dc9_***_Rodger, Wood
author Claire, Williams
Rodger, Wood
author2 Claire Williams
Rodger Wood
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
container_volume 32
container_issue 2
container_start_page 113
publishDate 2009
institution Swansea University
issn 1380-3395
1744-411X
doi_str_mv 10.1080/13803390902806543
publisher Taylor and Francis
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
url http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13803390902806543
document_store_str 0
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description <p>The current study examined emotion recognition following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and examined whether performance differed according to the affective valence and type of media presentation of the stimuli. A total of 64 patients with TBI and matched controls completed the Emotion Evaluation Test (EET) and Ekman 60 Faces Test (E-60-FT). Patients with TBI also completed measures of information processing and verbal ability. Results revealed that the TBI group were significantly impaired compared to controls when recognizing emotion on the EET and E-60-FT. A significant main effect of valence was found in both groups, with poor recognition of negative emotions. However, the difference between the recognition of positive and negative emotions was larger in the TBI group. The TBI group were also more accurate recognizing emotion displayed in audiovisual media (EET) than that displayed in still media (E-60-FT). No significant relationship was obtained between emotion recognition tasks and information-processing speed. A significant positive relationship was found between the E-60-FT and one measure of verbal ability. These findings support models of emotion that specify separate neurological pathways for certain emotions and different media and confirm that patients with TBI are vulnerable to experiencing emotion recognition difficulties.</p>
published_date 2009-05-29T03:18:37Z
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score 10.753653