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Neuropsychological correlates of organic alexithymia / Rodger Ll Wood; Claire Williams

Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Volume: 13, Issue: 03

Swansea University Author: Williams, Claire

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Abstract

<p>Deficits in emotional recognition and perception following traumatic  brain injury (TBI) have been associated with alexithymia (Henry et al.,  2006; Williams et al., 2001). This study examined the prevalence of  alexithymia in a TBI population, and its relationship to injury sever...

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Published in: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society
ISSN: 1355-6177 1469-7661
Published: Cambridge Journals 2007
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6748
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Abstract: <p>Deficits in emotional recognition and perception following traumatic  brain injury (TBI) have been associated with alexithymia (Henry et al.,  2006; Williams et al., 2001). This study examined the prevalence of  alexithymia in a TBI population, and its relationship to injury severity,  neuropsychological ability and affective disorder. A total of 121 patients  completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20), a measure that  addresses 3 distinct characteristics of the alexithymia concept;  difficulty identifying feelings, difficulty describing feelings, and  externally oriented thinking. Patients also completed a neuropsychological  assessment and measures of depression and anxiety. Results confirm a high  prevalence of alexithymia after TBI, relative to the general population  and an orthopedic control group. There was no relationship between injury  severity and the presence of alexithymia. A negative relationship was  found between alexithymia and verbal and sequencing abilities, but there  was no relationship with executive dysfunction or any other cognitive  domain. Moderate correlations were obtained between alexithymia and  affective disorder; regression analyses indicated that alexithymia,  depression, and anxiety should be considered distinct, but overlapping  constructs. The results of this study suggest that increased  neuropsychological attention should be directed towards emotional change  after head injury and its relationship with cognition and psychosocial  outcome.</p>
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 03