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Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 1077 views

Inter-professional differences in compliance with standard precautions in operating theatres: A multi-site, mixed methods study

Jayne Cutter, Sue Jordan

International Journal of Nursing Studies, Volume: 49, Issue: 8, Pages: 953 - 968

Swansea University Author: Jayne Cutter

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Abstract

Background: Blood-borne viral infections including HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C can be contracted by healthcare professionals during exposure prone following exposure to blood or body fluids. Standard precautions can reduce the risk of infection.Objectives: The study aimed firstly to identify th...

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Published in: International Journal of Nursing Studies
ISSN: 0020-7489
Published: Elsevier 2012
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa10677
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spelling 2015-05-11T09:01:37.2407101 v2 10677 2012-04-19 Inter-professional differences in compliance with standard precautions in operating theatres: A multi-site, mixed methods study 3fe2e541e1d50a75aa2f9ce8c1052ed5 Jayne Cutter Jayne Cutter true false 2012-04-19 HNU Background: Blood-borne viral infections including HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C can be contracted by healthcare professionals during exposure prone following exposure to blood or body fluids. Standard precautions can reduce the risk of infection.Objectives: The study aimed firstly to identify the frequency and causes of adverse exposures to blood and body fluids by surgeons and scrub nurses performing exposure prone procedures and secondly, to identify the extent of compliance with standard precautions and factors influencing compliance Design: A multi-site mixed methods study: a cross-sectional survey followed by a series of semi structured interviews.Settings: Six NHS trusts in Wales Participants: Surgeons and scrub nurses who performed exposure prone procedures and Senior Infection Control Nurses.Methods: A postal survey to all surgeons and scrub nurses followed by face to face interviews with puposively selected participants, and a telephone interview with Infection Control Nurses.Results: 315/612 surgeons and scrub nurses participated (response rate 51.47%). Most 219/315 (69.5%) respondents reportedsustaining an inoculation injury in the last five years: Sharps injuries were miost common (183/315, 58.1%) followed by splashes of blood or body fluid to the mucous membrane (40/315, 2.7%) splashes. Being a surgeon and believing injuries to be anoccupational hazard were significantly associated with increased risk of sharps’ injuries (adjusted odds ratio 1.73, 95% confidence interval 1.04–2.88 and adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 1.11–3.5, respectively). Compliance with standard precautions was poor with only 31/315 (10%) respondents always adhering to all precautions, 1/315 (0.003%) claimed never to comply with anyprecautions. Individual risk assessments informed the decision whether to take precuations. Compliance among surgeons was poorer among surgeons than nurses. For example, in relation to adoption of eye protection (adjusted odds ratio 0.28, 0.11–0.71) attendance at training sessions (odds ratio 0.111, 0.061–0.19). Conclusion: Compliance with standard precautions is poor. This may lead to an unacceptable risk of occupational acquisition of blood-borne viral infection. Strategies that respect inter-professional differences must be developed to to alter risk perception, improve compliance with standard precautions and reduce infection risks. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract International Journal of Nursing Studies 49 8 953 968 Elsevier 0020-7489 Compliance, mixed methods, inoculation injury, scrub nurses, standard precautions, surgeons 31 8 2012 2012-08-31 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.03.001 www.elsevier.com/ijns COLLEGE NANME Nursing COLLEGE CODE HNU Swansea University 2015-05-11T09:01:37.2407101 2012-04-19T14:18:48.9901768 College of Human and Health Sciences Nursing Jayne Cutter 1 Sue Jordan 2
title Inter-professional differences in compliance with standard precautions in operating theatres: A multi-site, mixed methods study
spellingShingle Inter-professional differences in compliance with standard precautions in operating theatres: A multi-site, mixed methods study
Jayne Cutter
title_short Inter-professional differences in compliance with standard precautions in operating theatres: A multi-site, mixed methods study
title_full Inter-professional differences in compliance with standard precautions in operating theatres: A multi-site, mixed methods study
title_fullStr Inter-professional differences in compliance with standard precautions in operating theatres: A multi-site, mixed methods study
title_full_unstemmed Inter-professional differences in compliance with standard precautions in operating theatres: A multi-site, mixed methods study
title_sort Inter-professional differences in compliance with standard precautions in operating theatres: A multi-site, mixed methods study
author_id_str_mv 3fe2e541e1d50a75aa2f9ce8c1052ed5
author_id_fullname_str_mv 3fe2e541e1d50a75aa2f9ce8c1052ed5_***_Jayne Cutter
author Jayne Cutter
author2 Jayne Cutter
Sue Jordan
format Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract
container_title International Journal of Nursing Studies
container_volume 49
container_issue 8
container_start_page 953
publishDate 2012
institution Swansea University
issn 0020-7489
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.03.001
publisher Elsevier
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Nursing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Nursing
url www.elsevier.com/ijns
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description Background: Blood-borne viral infections including HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C can be contracted by healthcare professionals during exposure prone following exposure to blood or body fluids. Standard precautions can reduce the risk of infection.Objectives: The study aimed firstly to identify the frequency and causes of adverse exposures to blood and body fluids by surgeons and scrub nurses performing exposure prone procedures and secondly, to identify the extent of compliance with standard precautions and factors influencing compliance Design: A multi-site mixed methods study: a cross-sectional survey followed by a series of semi structured interviews.Settings: Six NHS trusts in Wales Participants: Surgeons and scrub nurses who performed exposure prone procedures and Senior Infection Control Nurses.Methods: A postal survey to all surgeons and scrub nurses followed by face to face interviews with puposively selected participants, and a telephone interview with Infection Control Nurses.Results: 315/612 surgeons and scrub nurses participated (response rate 51.47%). Most 219/315 (69.5%) respondents reportedsustaining an inoculation injury in the last five years: Sharps injuries were miost common (183/315, 58.1%) followed by splashes of blood or body fluid to the mucous membrane (40/315, 2.7%) splashes. Being a surgeon and believing injuries to be anoccupational hazard were significantly associated with increased risk of sharps’ injuries (adjusted odds ratio 1.73, 95% confidence interval 1.04–2.88 and adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 1.11–3.5, respectively). Compliance with standard precautions was poor with only 31/315 (10%) respondents always adhering to all precautions, 1/315 (0.003%) claimed never to comply with anyprecautions. Individual risk assessments informed the decision whether to take precuations. Compliance among surgeons was poorer among surgeons than nurses. For example, in relation to adoption of eye protection (adjusted odds ratio 0.28, 0.11–0.71) attendance at training sessions (odds ratio 0.111, 0.061–0.19). Conclusion: Compliance with standard precautions is poor. This may lead to an unacceptable risk of occupational acquisition of blood-borne viral infection. Strategies that respect inter-professional differences must be developed to to alter risk perception, improve compliance with standard precautions and reduce infection risks.
published_date 2012-08-31T03:26:03Z
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