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A risk worth taking? Value differences and alternative risk constructions in accounts given by patients and their community workers following conditional discharge from forensic mental health services / Michael Coffey

Health, Risk & Society, Volume: 14, Issue: 5, Pages: 465 - 482

Swansea University Author: Coffey, Michael

Abstract

Returning to live in the community is seen differently by workers and people leaving forensic mental health care. Workers see risk embodied within the individual and therefore focus on the potential risk (informed by a historical emphasis) presented by the individual. For the patient risk is less ab...

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Published in: Health, Risk & Society
ISSN: 1369-8575 1469-8331
Published: 2012
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa10876
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Abstract: Returning to live in the community is seen differently by workers and people leaving forensic mental health care. Workers see risk embodied within the individual and therefore focus on the potential risk (informed by a historical emphasis) presented by the individual. For the patient risk is less about what they may do and more about that which may result from their new status as community living individuals. This paper based on 59 interviews conducted with patients and workers in forensic mental health settings shows that fears about deviant status is recurring concern for patients. In particular intensive aftercare is seen as a likely source of revealing their status to those in their neighborhoods, inviting unwanted attention and limiting opportunities to start new lives. Workers are not unaware of this but are driven by risk management imperatives to do what they can to monitor and mitigate risk behaviors. Community return and integration can in theory mediate risk where individuals gain access to, and make us of, social capital but intensive follow-up may work against this.
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 5
Start Page: 465
End Page: 482