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Modern Methods of Bile Acid Analysis by Mass Spectrometry: A View into the Metabolome / Yuqin Wang, William Griffiths

Current Analytical Chemistry, Volume: 3, Issue: 2, Pages: 103 - 126

Swansea University Author: William Griffiths

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Abstract

The advent of the “omics” revolution has reawakened an interest in the mass spectrometric analysis of bile acids, particularly in the related fields of lipidomics and metabolomics. This is due to the presence of bile acids in body fluids and their potential to act as biomarkers. Bile acids and bile...

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Published in: Current Analytical Chemistry
ISSN: 1573-4110 0000-0000
Published: 2007
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa10957
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spelling 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 v2 10957 2012-06-05 Modern Methods of Bile Acid Analysis by Mass Spectrometry: A View into the Metabolome 3316b1d1b524be1831790933eed1c26e 0000-0002-4129-6616 William Griffiths William Griffiths true false 2012-06-05 BMS The advent of the “omics” revolution has reawakened an interest in the mass spectrometric analysis of bile acids, particularly in the related fields of lipidomics and metabolomics. This is due to the presence of bile acids in body fluids and their potential to act as biomarkers. Bile acids and bile alcohols are formed from cholesterol in the liver. Bile acids are excreted from the liver into the small intestine via the bile duct conjugated with glycine or taurine at the side-chain carboxyl group. After assisting in the lipolysis and absorption of fats in the intestinal lumen, bile acids are returned to the liver. Bile acids and bile alcohols undergo further metabolism by bacterial and hepatic enzymes during the enterohepatic circulation, including hydrolysis of conjugates, oxidation and reduction, isomerisation, dehydroxylation and hydroxylation. The hydroxyl groups may also be conjugated with sulphuric acid, glucuronic acid, glucose or N-acetylglucosamine in the liver and in extrachepatic organs including intestine and kidney. Thus, the mixture of metabolic products of cholesterol in biological fluids can be very complex. Here we describe modern mass spectrometric methods used to characterise this diverse range of molecules found in biological fluids. Other Current Analytical Chemistry 3 2 103 126 1573-4110 0000-0000 31 12 2007 2007-12-31 10.2174/157341107780361709 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Sciences COLLEGE CODE BMS Swansea University 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 2012-06-05T17:20:21.4109758 Swansea University Medical School Medicine Yuqin Wang 1 William Griffiths 0000-0002-4129-6616 2
title Modern Methods of Bile Acid Analysis by Mass Spectrometry: A View into the Metabolome
spellingShingle Modern Methods of Bile Acid Analysis by Mass Spectrometry: A View into the Metabolome
William, Griffiths
title_short Modern Methods of Bile Acid Analysis by Mass Spectrometry: A View into the Metabolome
title_full Modern Methods of Bile Acid Analysis by Mass Spectrometry: A View into the Metabolome
title_fullStr Modern Methods of Bile Acid Analysis by Mass Spectrometry: A View into the Metabolome
title_full_unstemmed Modern Methods of Bile Acid Analysis by Mass Spectrometry: A View into the Metabolome
title_sort Modern Methods of Bile Acid Analysis by Mass Spectrometry: A View into the Metabolome
author_id_str_mv 3316b1d1b524be1831790933eed1c26e
author_id_fullname_str_mv 3316b1d1b524be1831790933eed1c26e_***_William, Griffiths
author William, Griffiths
author2 Yuqin Wang
William Griffiths
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container_start_page 103
publishDate 2007
institution Swansea University
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doi_str_mv 10.2174/157341107780361709
college_str Swansea University Medical School
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hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
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hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
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description The advent of the “omics” revolution has reawakened an interest in the mass spectrometric analysis of bile acids, particularly in the related fields of lipidomics and metabolomics. This is due to the presence of bile acids in body fluids and their potential to act as biomarkers. Bile acids and bile alcohols are formed from cholesterol in the liver. Bile acids are excreted from the liver into the small intestine via the bile duct conjugated with glycine or taurine at the side-chain carboxyl group. After assisting in the lipolysis and absorption of fats in the intestinal lumen, bile acids are returned to the liver. Bile acids and bile alcohols undergo further metabolism by bacterial and hepatic enzymes during the enterohepatic circulation, including hydrolysis of conjugates, oxidation and reduction, isomerisation, dehydroxylation and hydroxylation. The hydroxyl groups may also be conjugated with sulphuric acid, glucuronic acid, glucose or N-acetylglucosamine in the liver and in extrachepatic organs including intestine and kidney. Thus, the mixture of metabolic products of cholesterol in biological fluids can be very complex. Here we describe modern mass spectrometric methods used to characterise this diverse range of molecules found in biological fluids.
published_date 2007-12-31T03:21:49Z
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