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The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Framing of China in News Media‟s Coverage of Global Climate Change / Yan WU

Climate Change and Mass Media, Pages: 158 - 173

Swansea University Author: Wu, Yan

Abstract

This chapter applies framing theory to China’s representation in news media coverage of global climate change. Using the Lexis-Nexis Asia-Pacific News database, 285 news articles between 7 July 1998 and 7 July 2008 are analysed. The stories chosen have “China” in their headlines and have either “cli...

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Published in: Climate Change and Mass Media
Published: Oxford Peter Lang 2009
Online Access: http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?event=cmp.ccc.seitenstruktur.detailseiten&seitentyp=produkt&pk=53883
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa11359
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spelling 2015-10-19T15:29:44Z v2 11359 2012-06-14 The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Framing of China in News Media‟s Coverage of Global Climate Change Yan Wu Yan Wu true 0000-0002-5741-6862 false fcb0b08dd7afa00f6899a02d4cb66fff 59aa0a8361a678c76370fea85629241a iS8iDuFHCqS9bqIIDjMsbp2hP0Dd92ep9B31FNtueRs= 2012-06-14 AMED This chapter applies framing theory to China’s representation in news media coverage of global climate change. Using the Lexis-Nexis Asia-Pacific News database, 285 news articles between 7 July 1998 and 7 July 2008 are analysed. The stories chosen have “China” in their headlines and have either “climate change” or “global warming” mentioned at least three times in the main body. These stories come from 47 news outlets based in 17 countries and regions,1 including major international media players such as Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the AFP, the Associated Press, Chinadaily.com.cn, Deutsche Presse-Agentur, the United Press International, and Xinhua News Agency. Such a sample allows an insight into patterns of global climate change discourse by comparing media coverage of the same issue across geopolitical regions and over a period of time. Key questions asked in this chapter include: How do media visualise global climate change and its connection to China? Who are the major claims-makers in media’s coverage of global climate change? What is the evaluation by different media of global climate change as a risk? Chapter in book Climate Change and Mass Media 158 173 Peter Lang Oxford China; global climate change; media representation 0 0 2009 2009-01-01 http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?event=cmp.ccc.seitenstruktur.detailseiten&seitentyp=produkt&pk=53883 College of Arts and Humanities Media and Communication Studies CAAH AMED None 2015-10-19T15:29:44Z 2012-06-14T15:38:35Z College of Arts and Humanities Political and Cultural Studies Yan WU 1
title The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Framing of China in News Media‟s Coverage of Global Climate Change
spellingShingle The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Framing of China in News Media‟s Coverage of Global Climate Change
Wu, Yan
title_short The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Framing of China in News Media‟s Coverage of Global Climate Change
title_full The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Framing of China in News Media‟s Coverage of Global Climate Change
title_fullStr The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Framing of China in News Media‟s Coverage of Global Climate Change
title_full_unstemmed The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Framing of China in News Media‟s Coverage of Global Climate Change
title_sort The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Framing of China in News Media‟s Coverage of Global Climate Change
author_id_str_mv fcb0b08dd7afa00f6899a02d4cb66fff
author_id_fullname_str_mv fcb0b08dd7afa00f6899a02d4cb66fff_***_Wu, Yan
author Wu, Yan
author2 Yan WU
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container_title Climate Change and Mass Media
container_start_page 158
publishDate 2009
institution Swansea University
publisher Peter Lang
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
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department_str Political and Cultural Studies{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}Political and Cultural Studies
url http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?event=cmp.ccc.seitenstruktur.detailseiten&seitentyp=produkt&pk=53883
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description This chapter applies framing theory to China’s representation in news media coverage of global climate change. Using the Lexis-Nexis Asia-Pacific News database, 285 news articles between 7 July 1998 and 7 July 2008 are analysed. The stories chosen have “China” in their headlines and have either “climate change” or “global warming” mentioned at least three times in the main body. These stories come from 47 news outlets based in 17 countries and regions,1 including major international media players such as Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the AFP, the Associated Press, Chinadaily.com.cn, Deutsche Presse-Agentur, the United Press International, and Xinhua News Agency. Such a sample allows an insight into patterns of global climate change discourse by comparing media coverage of the same issue across geopolitical regions and over a period of time. Key questions asked in this chapter include: How do media visualise global climate change and its connection to China? Who are the major claims-makers in media’s coverage of global climate change? What is the evaluation by different media of global climate change as a risk?
published_date 2009-01-01T20:27:33Z
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score 10.837508