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Maternal Nutrient Restriction between Early and Midgestation and Its Impact Upon Appetite Regulation after Juvenile Obesity

S. P Sebert, M. A Hyatt, L. L. Y Chan, N Patel, R. C Bell, D Keisler, T Stephenson, H Budge, M. E Symonds, D. S Gardner, Melanie Healy

Endocrinology, Volume: 150, Issue: 2, Pages: 634 - 641

Swansea University Author: Melanie Healy

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DOI (Published version): 10.1210/en.2008-0542

Abstract

The impact of maternal nutrient restriction during early-to-midgestation, a period coinciding with early fetal brain development, on appetite regulation and energy balance in the offspring after juvenile obesity was examined. Pregnant sheep were either fed to meet fully their nutritional requirement...

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Published in: Endocrinology
ISSN: 0013-7227
Published: 2008
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa12197
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spelling 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 v2 12197 2012-07-20 Maternal Nutrient Restriction between Early and Midgestation and Its Impact Upon Appetite Regulation after Juvenile Obesity 4654b4128fb21d68f98e2abc8538b45a Melanie Healy Melanie Healy true false 2012-07-20 BMS The impact of maternal nutrient restriction during early-to-midgestation, a period coinciding with early fetal brain development, on appetite regulation and energy balance in the offspring after juvenile obesity was examined. Pregnant sheep were either fed to meet fully their nutritional requirements throughout gestation or 50% of this amount between 30 and 80 d gestation. After weaning, offspring were either made obese through exposure to a sedentary obesogenic environment or remained lean. Maternal nutrient restriction had no effect on birth weight or subsequent growth. At 1 wk of age, only, gene expression for neuropeptide Y in the hypothalamus was reduced in nutrient-restricted offspring. By 1 yr of age, all O animals had increased plasma leptin, nonesterified fatty acids, and insulin, with the latter effect amplified in NR offspring. Fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, and cortisol were unaffected by obesity. The entrained reduction in physical activity that led to obesity persisted when all animals were maintained within individual pens. However, NRO offspring exhibited reduced daily food intake and were, therefore, no longer in positive "energy balance." This adaptation was accompanied by elevated hypothalamic gene expression for the melanocortin-4 and insulin receptors, AMP-activated kinase, and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase alpha. In conclusion, nutrient restriction specifically targeted over the period of early fetal brain development contributes to a profoundly different adaptation in energy balance after juvenile obesity. The extent to which this adaptive response may benefit the offspring or result in an exacerbated risk of type 2 diabetes remains to be established. Journal Article Endocrinology 150 2 634 641 0013-7227 30 9 2008 2008-09-30 10.1210/en.2008-0542 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2875166/?tool=pubmed COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Sciences COLLEGE CODE BMS Swansea University 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 2012-07-20T11:52:08.7964252 Swansea University Medical School Medicine S. P Sebert 1 M. A Hyatt 2 L. L. Y Chan 3 N Patel 4 R. C Bell 5 D Keisler 6 T Stephenson 7 H Budge 8 M. E Symonds 9 D. S Gardner 10 Melanie Healy 11
title Maternal Nutrient Restriction between Early and Midgestation and Its Impact Upon Appetite Regulation after Juvenile Obesity
spellingShingle Maternal Nutrient Restriction between Early and Midgestation and Its Impact Upon Appetite Regulation after Juvenile Obesity
Melanie Healy
title_short Maternal Nutrient Restriction between Early and Midgestation and Its Impact Upon Appetite Regulation after Juvenile Obesity
title_full Maternal Nutrient Restriction between Early and Midgestation and Its Impact Upon Appetite Regulation after Juvenile Obesity
title_fullStr Maternal Nutrient Restriction between Early and Midgestation and Its Impact Upon Appetite Regulation after Juvenile Obesity
title_full_unstemmed Maternal Nutrient Restriction between Early and Midgestation and Its Impact Upon Appetite Regulation after Juvenile Obesity
title_sort Maternal Nutrient Restriction between Early and Midgestation and Its Impact Upon Appetite Regulation after Juvenile Obesity
author_id_str_mv 4654b4128fb21d68f98e2abc8538b45a
author_id_fullname_str_mv 4654b4128fb21d68f98e2abc8538b45a_***_Melanie Healy
author Melanie Healy
author2 S. P Sebert
M. A Hyatt
L. L. Y Chan
N Patel
R. C Bell
D Keisler
T Stephenson
H Budge
M. E Symonds
D. S Gardner
Melanie Healy
format Journal article
container_title Endocrinology
container_volume 150
container_issue 2
container_start_page 634
publishDate 2008
institution Swansea University
issn 0013-7227
doi_str_mv 10.1210/en.2008-0542
college_str Swansea University Medical School
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
hierarchy_parent_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2875166/?tool=pubmed
document_store_str 0
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description The impact of maternal nutrient restriction during early-to-midgestation, a period coinciding with early fetal brain development, on appetite regulation and energy balance in the offspring after juvenile obesity was examined. Pregnant sheep were either fed to meet fully their nutritional requirements throughout gestation or 50% of this amount between 30 and 80 d gestation. After weaning, offspring were either made obese through exposure to a sedentary obesogenic environment or remained lean. Maternal nutrient restriction had no effect on birth weight or subsequent growth. At 1 wk of age, only, gene expression for neuropeptide Y in the hypothalamus was reduced in nutrient-restricted offspring. By 1 yr of age, all O animals had increased plasma leptin, nonesterified fatty acids, and insulin, with the latter effect amplified in NR offspring. Fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, and cortisol were unaffected by obesity. The entrained reduction in physical activity that led to obesity persisted when all animals were maintained within individual pens. However, NRO offspring exhibited reduced daily food intake and were, therefore, no longer in positive "energy balance." This adaptation was accompanied by elevated hypothalamic gene expression for the melanocortin-4 and insulin receptors, AMP-activated kinase, and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase alpha. In conclusion, nutrient restriction specifically targeted over the period of early fetal brain development contributes to a profoundly different adaptation in energy balance after juvenile obesity. The extent to which this adaptive response may benefit the offspring or result in an exacerbated risk of type 2 diabetes remains to be established.
published_date 2008-09-30T03:28:10Z
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