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Measuring the Population Burden of Injuries—Implications for Global and National Estimates: A Multi-centre Prospective UK Longitudinal Study / Ronan A Lyons; Denise Kendrick; Elizabeth M Towner; Nicola Christie; Steven Macey; Carol Coupland; Belinda J Gabbe; Emmanuel Lagarde

PLoS Medicine, Volume: 8, Issue: 12, Start page: e1001140

Swansea University Author: Lyons, Ronan

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Abstract

Background: Current methods of measuring the population burden of injuries rely on many assumptions and limited dataavailable to the global burden of diseases (GBD) studies. The aim of this study was to compare the population burden ofinjuries using different approaches from the UK Burden of Injury...

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Published in: PLoS Medicine
ISSN: 1549-1676
Published: 2011
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa13316
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spelling 2015-12-08T11:01:54Z v2 13316 2012-11-20 Measuring the Population Burden of Injuries—Implications for Global and National Estimates: A Multi-centre Prospective UK Longitudinal Study Ronan Lyons Ronan Lyons true 0000-0001-5225-000X false 83efcf2a9dfcf8b55586999d3d152ac6 e763f4b296d12d0d0749157eeaeaea37 JYZP6diXJvJ7o04hr3Eq8Qgr5y2nBRz3haj4DmVVDsQ= 2012-11-20 PMSC Background: Current methods of measuring the population burden of injuries rely on many assumptions and limited dataavailable to the global burden of diseases (GBD) studies. The aim of this study was to compare the population burden ofinjuries using different approaches from the UK Burden of Injury (UKBOI) and GBD studies.Methods and Findings: The UKBOI was a prospective cohort of 1,517 injured individuals that collected patient-reportedoutcomes. Extrapolated outcome data were combined with multiple sources of morbidity and mortality data to derivepopulation metrics of the burden of injury in the UK. Participants were injured patients recruited from hospitals in four UKcities and towns: Swansea, Nottingham, Bristol, and Guildford, between September 2005 and April 2007. Patient-reportedchanges in quality of life using the EQ-5D at baseline, 1, 4, and 12 months after injury provided disability weights used tocalculate the years lived with disability (YLDs) component of disability adjusted life years (DALYs). DALYs were calculated forthe UK and extrapolated to global estimates using both UKBOI and GBD disability weights. Estimated numbers (and ratesper 100,000) for UK population extrapolations were 750,999 (1,240) for hospital admissions, 7,982,947 (13,339) foremergency department (ED) attendances, and 22,185 (36.8) for injury-related deaths in 2005. Nonadmitted ED-treatedinjuries accounted for 67% of YLDs. Estimates for UK DALYs amounted to 1,771,486 (82% due to YLDs), compared with669,822 (52% due to YLDs) using the GBD approach. Extrapolating patient-derived disability weights to GBD estimateswould increase injury-related DALYs 2.6-fold.Conclusions: The use of disability weights derived from patient experiences combined with additional morbidity data onED-treated patients and inpatients suggests that the absolute burden of injury is higher than previously estimated. Thesefindings have substantial implications for improving measurement of the national and global burden of injury. Journal article PLoS Medicine 8 12 e1001140 1549-1676 injury; Global Burden of Diseases; DALY; UK 0 0 2011 2011-01-01 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001140 Swansea University Medical School Medicine CMED PMSC Patient & population health and informatics None 2015-12-08T11:01:54Z 2012-11-20T09:01:26Z Swansea University Medical School Medicine Ronan A Lyons 1 Denise Kendrick 2 Elizabeth M Towner 3 Nicola Christie 4 Steven Macey 5 Carol Coupland 6 Belinda J Gabbe 7 Emmanuel Lagarde 8
title Measuring the Population Burden of Injuries—Implications for Global and National Estimates: A Multi-centre Prospective UK Longitudinal Study
spellingShingle Measuring the Population Burden of Injuries—Implications for Global and National Estimates: A Multi-centre Prospective UK Longitudinal Study
Lyons, Ronan
title_short Measuring the Population Burden of Injuries—Implications for Global and National Estimates: A Multi-centre Prospective UK Longitudinal Study
title_full Measuring the Population Burden of Injuries—Implications for Global and National Estimates: A Multi-centre Prospective UK Longitudinal Study
title_fullStr Measuring the Population Burden of Injuries—Implications for Global and National Estimates: A Multi-centre Prospective UK Longitudinal Study
title_full_unstemmed Measuring the Population Burden of Injuries—Implications for Global and National Estimates: A Multi-centre Prospective UK Longitudinal Study
title_sort Measuring the Population Burden of Injuries—Implications for Global and National Estimates: A Multi-centre Prospective UK Longitudinal Study
author_id_str_mv 83efcf2a9dfcf8b55586999d3d152ac6
author_id_fullname_str_mv 83efcf2a9dfcf8b55586999d3d152ac6_***_Lyons, Ronan
author Lyons, Ronan
author2 Ronan A Lyons
Denise Kendrick
Elizabeth M Towner
Nicola Christie
Steven Macey
Carol Coupland
Belinda J Gabbe
Emmanuel Lagarde
format Journal article
container_title PLoS Medicine
container_volume 8
container_issue 12
container_start_page e1001140
publishDate 2011
institution Swansea University
issn 1549-1676
doi_str_mv 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001140
college_str Swansea University Medical School
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
hierarchy_parent_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
document_store_str 0
active_str 1
researchgroup_str Patient & population health and informatics
description Background: Current methods of measuring the population burden of injuries rely on many assumptions and limited dataavailable to the global burden of diseases (GBD) studies. The aim of this study was to compare the population burden ofinjuries using different approaches from the UK Burden of Injury (UKBOI) and GBD studies.Methods and Findings: The UKBOI was a prospective cohort of 1,517 injured individuals that collected patient-reportedoutcomes. Extrapolated outcome data were combined with multiple sources of morbidity and mortality data to derivepopulation metrics of the burden of injury in the UK. Participants were injured patients recruited from hospitals in four UKcities and towns: Swansea, Nottingham, Bristol, and Guildford, between September 2005 and April 2007. Patient-reportedchanges in quality of life using the EQ-5D at baseline, 1, 4, and 12 months after injury provided disability weights used tocalculate the years lived with disability (YLDs) component of disability adjusted life years (DALYs). DALYs were calculated forthe UK and extrapolated to global estimates using both UKBOI and GBD disability weights. Estimated numbers (and ratesper 100,000) for UK population extrapolations were 750,999 (1,240) for hospital admissions, 7,982,947 (13,339) foremergency department (ED) attendances, and 22,185 (36.8) for injury-related deaths in 2005. Nonadmitted ED-treatedinjuries accounted for 67% of YLDs. Estimates for UK DALYs amounted to 1,771,486 (82% due to YLDs), compared with669,822 (52% due to YLDs) using the GBD approach. Extrapolating patient-derived disability weights to GBD estimateswould increase injury-related DALYs 2.6-fold.Conclusions: The use of disability weights derived from patient experiences combined with additional morbidity data onED-treated patients and inpatients suggests that the absolute burden of injury is higher than previously estimated. Thesefindings have substantial implications for improving measurement of the national and global burden of injury.
published_date 2011-01-01T04:10:42Z
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