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‘Terroristic Narratives: On the (Re)Invention of Peace in Northern Ireland’ / Cillian McGrattan

Terrorism and Political Violence, Volume: 23, Issue: 3, Pages: 357 - 376

Swansea University Author: Cillian, McGrattan

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DOI (Published version): 10.1080/09546553.2010.542074

Abstract

It has been argued that a key factor in explaining the relative success of the Northern Ireland peace process is the role played by Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Community-Based Organisations (CBOs) in fostering dialogue and promoting shared space for cooperation across the communal divi...

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Published in: Terrorism and Political Violence
Published: 2011
Online Access: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09546553.2010.542074
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa13473
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last_indexed 2018-02-09T04:44:14Z
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spelling 2013-09-11T16:44:30.3834641 v2 13473 2012-12-04 ‘Terroristic Narratives: On the (Re)Invention of Peace in Northern Ireland’ 9f526e9185415b9457ddc7826f0854c2 Cillian McGrattan Cillian McGrattan true false 2012-12-04 It has been argued that a key factor in explaining the relative success of the Northern Ireland peace process is the role played by Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Community-Based Organisations (CBOs) in fostering dialogue and promoting shared space for cooperation across the communal divide. This article critically interrogates the normative import of that narrative, which implies that NGOs and CBOs occupy a higher moral ground than state-sponsored agencies. In large part this is attributed to both their indigenous character and their close proximity to terrorist violence. Indeed, several of these NGOs and CBOs are staffed by individuals who were convicted and imprisoned for terrorist-related offences. This article is less concerned with the actions of these non-state actors than with the political and moral foundations of the “peace consultancy industry,” which has grown up around the design, implementation, and ongoing evaluation of these projects. We argue that by importing tautological—and sometimes cynical—understandings of the term “peace,” these consultants risk complicity in reproducing the terroristic narratives that inspired and perpetuated the conflict in the first instance Journal Article Terrorism and Political Violence 23 3 357 376 31 12 2011 2011-12-31 10.1080/09546553.2010.542074 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09546553.2010.542074 COLLEGE NANME COLLEGE CODE Swansea University 2013-09-11T16:44:30.3834641 2012-12-04T17:42:52.9908582 College of Arts and Humanities Political and Cultural Studies Cillian McGrattan 1
title ‘Terroristic Narratives: On the (Re)Invention of Peace in Northern Ireland’
spellingShingle ‘Terroristic Narratives: On the (Re)Invention of Peace in Northern Ireland’
Cillian, McGrattan
title_short ‘Terroristic Narratives: On the (Re)Invention of Peace in Northern Ireland’
title_full ‘Terroristic Narratives: On the (Re)Invention of Peace in Northern Ireland’
title_fullStr ‘Terroristic Narratives: On the (Re)Invention of Peace in Northern Ireland’
title_full_unstemmed ‘Terroristic Narratives: On the (Re)Invention of Peace in Northern Ireland’
title_sort ‘Terroristic Narratives: On the (Re)Invention of Peace in Northern Ireland’
author_id_str_mv 9f526e9185415b9457ddc7826f0854c2
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9f526e9185415b9457ddc7826f0854c2_***_Cillian, McGrattan
author Cillian, McGrattan
author2 Cillian McGrattan
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container_start_page 357
publishDate 2011
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1080/09546553.2010.542074
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hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
department_str Political and Cultural Studies{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}Political and Cultural Studies
url http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09546553.2010.542074
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description It has been argued that a key factor in explaining the relative success of the Northern Ireland peace process is the role played by Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Community-Based Organisations (CBOs) in fostering dialogue and promoting shared space for cooperation across the communal divide. This article critically interrogates the normative import of that narrative, which implies that NGOs and CBOs occupy a higher moral ground than state-sponsored agencies. In large part this is attributed to both their indigenous character and their close proximity to terrorist violence. Indeed, several of these NGOs and CBOs are staffed by individuals who were convicted and imprisoned for terrorist-related offences. This article is less concerned with the actions of these non-state actors than with the political and moral foundations of the “peace consultancy industry,” which has grown up around the design, implementation, and ongoing evaluation of these projects. We argue that by importing tautological—and sometimes cynical—understandings of the term “peace,” these consultants risk complicity in reproducing the terroristic narratives that inspired and perpetuated the conflict in the first instance
published_date 2011-12-31T03:24:48Z
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