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Mobility, accessibility and quality of later life / Charles Musselwhite; Hebba Haddad

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, Volume: 11, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Musselwhite, Charles

Abstract

Older people today are more active and more mobile than previous generations. However, they continue to suffer a reduction in quality of life when giving up driving. This article reports research carried out to identify the role of mobility and accessibility in older people's self-reported qual...

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Published in: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
ISSN: 1471-7794
Published: 2010
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa14529
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spelling 2013-05-01T12:54:12Z v2 14529 2013-04-05 Mobility, accessibility and quality of later life Charles Musselwhite Charles Musselwhite true 0000-0002-4831-2092 false c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c 75beebc8067424cc969d67472c4466a7 InStp5CuNrzTiXll2RhycFI/4mL4zIy/GXDlPjHD2Zg= 2013-04-05 HIA Older people today are more active and more mobile than previous generations. However, they continue to suffer a reduction in quality of life when giving up driving. This article reports research carried out to identify the role of mobility and accessibility in older people's self-reported quality of life, through an in-depth examination of older people's travel needs. A wholly qualitative approach, utilising a variety of data collection methods including focus groups, interviews and diary completion, was employed with 57 people aged over 65 in the UK, of which 26 were drivers and 31 had recently given up driving. The findings emphasise the importance of mobility for accessing services and shops. However, the reasons why older people travel and the importance of mobility go beyond accessibility to include the desire for independence, control, maintaining status, inclusion, ‘normalness’ and travel for its own sake. All these are related to an individual's perception of quality of life. When older people give up driving, their self-reported quality of life is reduced and this seems very much related to a reduction in affective and aesthetic qualities of mobility that a car affords that walking and using public transport lack. It is suggested that policy and practice needs to consider such motives for travel Journal article Quality in Ageing and Older Adults 11 1 37 1471-7794 older people, active, mobility, quality of life, health, transport 0 0 2010 2010-01-01 10.5042/qiaoa.2010.0153 http://dx.doi.org/10.5042/qiaoa.2010.0153 College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing CHHS HIA Swansea University Centre for Innovative Ageing None 2013-05-01T12:54:12Z 2013-04-05T16:12:17Z College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing Charles Musselwhite 1 Hebba Haddad 2 0014529-08042013142934.pdf Musselwhite and Haddad Access Mobility and QoL in Later Life preprint.pdf 2013-04-08T14:29:34Z Output 99 NA true Uploaded to RIS 01/01/2014 2012-04-08T00:00:00 false
title Mobility, accessibility and quality of later life
spellingShingle Mobility, accessibility and quality of later life
Musselwhite, Charles
title_short Mobility, accessibility and quality of later life
title_full Mobility, accessibility and quality of later life
title_fullStr Mobility, accessibility and quality of later life
title_full_unstemmed Mobility, accessibility and quality of later life
title_sort Mobility, accessibility and quality of later life
author_id_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c
author_id_fullname_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c_***_Musselwhite, Charles
author Musselwhite, Charles
author2 Charles Musselwhite
Hebba Haddad
format Journal article
container_title Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
container_volume 11
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publishDate 2010
institution Swansea University
issn 1471-7794
doi_str_mv 10.5042/qiaoa.2010.0153
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Centre for Innovative Ageing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Centre for Innovative Ageing
url http://dx.doi.org/10.5042/qiaoa.2010.0153
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researchgroup_str Centre for Innovative Ageing
description Older people today are more active and more mobile than previous generations. However, they continue to suffer a reduction in quality of life when giving up driving. This article reports research carried out to identify the role of mobility and accessibility in older people's self-reported quality of life, through an in-depth examination of older people's travel needs. A wholly qualitative approach, utilising a variety of data collection methods including focus groups, interviews and diary completion, was employed with 57 people aged over 65 in the UK, of which 26 were drivers and 31 had recently given up driving. The findings emphasise the importance of mobility for accessing services and shops. However, the reasons why older people travel and the importance of mobility go beyond accessibility to include the desire for independence, control, maintaining status, inclusion, ‘normalness’ and travel for its own sake. All these are related to an individual's perception of quality of life. When older people give up driving, their self-reported quality of life is reduced and this seems very much related to a reduction in affective and aesthetic qualities of mobility that a car affords that walking and using public transport lack. It is suggested that policy and practice needs to consider such motives for travel
published_date 2010-01-01T19:00:32Z
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