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Smokers discount their drug of abuse in the same way as other consumable rewards / Gabriela M. Jiga-Boy; Kayleigh Storey; Marc J. Buehner

The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Swansea University Author: Jiga-Boy, Gabriela

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DOI (Published version): 10.1080/17470218.2013.772646

Abstract

Recent research shows that drug abusers discount delayed monetary rewards more than nonabusers do, and they discount delayed substances of abuse (e.g., drugs) more than delayed money. Furthermore, non-drug-abusers discount food and substances of abuse (e.g., alcohol), more than money. Here, we compa...

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Published in: The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Published: 2013
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa14626
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Abstract: Recent research shows that drug abusers discount delayed monetary rewards more than nonabusers do, and they discount delayed substances of abuse (e.g., drugs) more than delayed money. Furthermore, non-drug-abusers discount food and substances of abuse (e.g., alcohol), more than money. Here, we compare the delay and probability discounting of money with that of a directly consumable reward (cho- colate) and with that of a substance of abuse (cigarettes), in a drug-using population (smokers). In line with previous research, we found in two experiments that delay discounting differentiated between smokers and nonsmokers, and between money and a nonabused directly consumable reward (choco- late). In addition, our results show that there appears to be no difference in the extent to which smokers discount their abused substance compared to another directly consumable reward. These find- ings support the contention that drugs and food are part of the same category of primary reinforcers, whereas money is discounted differently, as a conditioned reinforcer.
Keywords: Delay discounting; Smoking; Primary reinforcers.
College: College of Human and Health Sciences