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Attitudes towards vehicle driving behaviour: Categorising and contextualising risk / Charles Musselwhite

Accident Analysis & Prevention, Volume: 38, Issue: 2

Swansea University Author: Musselwhite, Charles

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Abstract

In driving motorised vehicles, the amount of risk accepted varies between individuals. Traditional theories of risk have tended to focus on a lack of skill as a function of risk taking and have ignored social motivations and attitudes for engaging in risk. This study aims to categorise and contextua...

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Published in: Accident Analysis & Prevention
ISSN: 0001-4575
Published: 2006
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa14674
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first_indexed 2013-07-23T12:12:40Z
last_indexed 2019-06-14T19:17:53Z
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spelling 2019-06-14T11:46:22Z v2 14674 2013-04-23 Attitudes towards vehicle driving behaviour: Categorising and contextualising risk Charles Musselwhite Charles Musselwhite true 0000-0002-4831-2092 false c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c 75beebc8067424cc969d67472c4466a7 InStp5CuNrzTiXll2RhycFI/4mL4zIy/GXDlPjHD2Zg= 2013-04-23 HIA In driving motorised vehicles, the amount of risk accepted varies between individuals. Traditional theories of risk have tended to focus on a lack of skill as a function of risk taking and have ignored social motivations and attitudes for engaging in risk. This study aims to categorise and contextualise risk taking behaviour in relation to car driving through studying the motivations and attitudes towards risk. The results were tested on a representative sample (n = 1655) of the UK driving population and four groups were identified based on motivations; those that took risk unintentionally formed the largest group. Three smaller groups who took deliberate risks were also found, a reactive risk taking group who took risks when reacting to stress or being in a hurry, a calculated risk taking group who took risks when they felt it was safe to do so, such as late at night or on well-known roads, and a continuous risk taking group who frequently took risks for their own sake Journal article Accident Analysis & Prevention 38 2 334 0001-4575 Risk; Driving; Attitudes; Motivation 0 3 2006 2006-03-01 10.1016/j.aap.2005.10.003 College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing CHHS HIA Swansea University Centre for Innovative Ageing None 2019-06-14T11:46:22Z 2013-04-23T15:43:23Z College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing Charles Musselwhite 1
title Attitudes towards vehicle driving behaviour: Categorising and contextualising risk
spellingShingle Attitudes towards vehicle driving behaviour: Categorising and contextualising risk
Musselwhite, Charles
title_short Attitudes towards vehicle driving behaviour: Categorising and contextualising risk
title_full Attitudes towards vehicle driving behaviour: Categorising and contextualising risk
title_fullStr Attitudes towards vehicle driving behaviour: Categorising and contextualising risk
title_full_unstemmed Attitudes towards vehicle driving behaviour: Categorising and contextualising risk
title_sort Attitudes towards vehicle driving behaviour: Categorising and contextualising risk
author_id_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c
author_id_fullname_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c_***_Musselwhite, Charles
author Musselwhite, Charles
author2 Charles Musselwhite
format Journal article
container_title Accident Analysis & Prevention
container_volume 38
container_issue 2
publishDate 2006
institution Swansea University
issn 0001-4575
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.aap.2005.10.003
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Centre for Innovative Ageing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Centre for Innovative Ageing
document_store_str 0
active_str 1
researchgroup_str Centre for Innovative Ageing
description In driving motorised vehicles, the amount of risk accepted varies between individuals. Traditional theories of risk have tended to focus on a lack of skill as a function of risk taking and have ignored social motivations and attitudes for engaging in risk. This study aims to categorise and contextualise risk taking behaviour in relation to car driving through studying the motivations and attitudes towards risk. The results were tested on a representative sample (n = 1655) of the UK driving population and four groups were identified based on motivations; those that took risk unintentionally formed the largest group. Three smaller groups who took deliberate risks were also found, a reactive risk taking group who took risks when reacting to stress or being in a hurry, a calculated risk taking group who took risks when they felt it was safe to do so, such as late at night or on well-known roads, and a continuous risk taking group who frequently took risks for their own sake
published_date 2006-03-01T15:00:45Z
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