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The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities

Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo, Denise Kendrick, Elizabeth M. L Towner, Carol Coupland, Mike Hayes, Nicola Christie, Judith Sleney, Sarah Jones, Richard Kimberlee, Sarah Rodgers Orcid Logo, Samantha Turner, Mariana Brussoni, Yana Vinogradova, Tinnu Sarvotham, Steven Macey

PLoS ONE, Volume: 8, Issue: 4

Swansea University Authors: Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo, Sarah Rodgers Orcid Logo

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Abstract

To determine whether advocacy targeted at local politicians leads to action to reduce the risk of pedestrian injury in deprived areas.A Cluster randomised controlled trial in 239 electoral wards in 57 local authorities in England and Wales with 617 elected local politicians.Intervention group politi...

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Published in: PLoS ONE
ISSN: 1932-6203
Published: 2013
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa14760
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Secondary outcomes included politicians&#x2019; interest and involvement in injury prevention, and facilitators and barriers to implementation.Primary outcomes did not significantly differ: % difference in traffic calming (0.07, 95%CI: &#x2212;0.07 to 0.20); proportion of schools with 20 mph zones (RR 1.47, 95%CI: 0.93 to 2.32), Safe Routes to School (RR 1.34, 95%CI: 0.83 to 2.17), pedestrian training (RR 1.23, 95%CI: 0.95 to 1.61) or other safety education (RR 1.16, 95%CI: 0.97 to 1.39). Intervention group politicians reported greater interest in child injury prevention (RR 1.09, 95%CI 1.03 to 1.16), belief in potential to help prevent injuries (RR 1.36, 95%CI 1.16 to 1.61), particularly pedestrian safety (RR 1.55, 95%CI 1.19 to 2.03). 63% of intervention politicians reported supporting new pedestrian safety schemes. The majority found the advocacy information surprising, interesting, effectively presented, and could identify suitable local interventions.This study demonstrates the feasibility of an innovative approach to translational public health by targeting local politicians in a randomised controlled trial. The intervention package was positively viewed and raised interest but changes in interventions were not statistically significance. 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spelling 2013-06-13T13:22:46.1125495 v2 14760 2013-04-29 The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities 83efcf2a9dfcf8b55586999d3d152ac6 0000-0001-5225-000X Ronan Lyons Ronan Lyons true false e81e94dea293640575619d15baf34a35 0000-0002-4483-0845 Sarah Rodgers Sarah Rodgers true false 2013-04-29 HDAT To determine whether advocacy targeted at local politicians leads to action to reduce the risk of pedestrian injury in deprived areas.A Cluster randomised controlled trial in 239 electoral wards in 57 local authorities in England and Wales with 617 elected local politicians.Intervention group politicians were provided with tailored information packs, including maps of casualty sites, numbers injured and a synopsis of effective interventions.25–30 months post intervention, primary outcomes included: electoral ward level: percentage of road traffic calmed; proportion with new interventions; school level: percentage with 20 mph zones, Safe Routes to School, pedestrian training or road safety education; politician level: percentage lobbying for safety measures. Secondary outcomes included politicians’ interest and involvement in injury prevention, and facilitators and barriers to implementation.Primary outcomes did not significantly differ: % difference in traffic calming (0.07, 95%CI: −0.07 to 0.20); proportion of schools with 20 mph zones (RR 1.47, 95%CI: 0.93 to 2.32), Safe Routes to School (RR 1.34, 95%CI: 0.83 to 2.17), pedestrian training (RR 1.23, 95%CI: 0.95 to 1.61) or other safety education (RR 1.16, 95%CI: 0.97 to 1.39). Intervention group politicians reported greater interest in child injury prevention (RR 1.09, 95%CI 1.03 to 1.16), belief in potential to help prevent injuries (RR 1.36, 95%CI 1.16 to 1.61), particularly pedestrian safety (RR 1.55, 95%CI 1.19 to 2.03). 63% of intervention politicians reported supporting new pedestrian safety schemes. The majority found the advocacy information surprising, interesting, effectively presented, and could identify suitable local interventions.This study demonstrates the feasibility of an innovative approach to translational public health by targeting local politicians in a randomised controlled trial. The intervention package was positively viewed and raised interest but changes in interventions were not statistically significance. Longer term supported advocacy may be needed. Journal Article PLoS ONE 8 4 1932-6203 8 4 2013 2013-04-08 10.1371/journal.pone.0060158 http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0060158 Hills is the journal editor, not first author COLLEGE NANME Health Data Science COLLEGE CODE HDAT Swansea University 2013-06-13T13:22:46.1125495 2013-04-29T15:17:27.9153219 Swansea University Medical School Medicine Ronan Lyons 0000-0001-5225-000X 1 Denise Kendrick 2 Elizabeth M. L Towner 3 Carol Coupland 4 Mike Hayes 5 Nicola Christie 6 Judith Sleney 7 Sarah Jones 8 Richard Kimberlee 9 Sarah Rodgers 0000-0002-4483-0845 10 Samantha Turner 11 Mariana Brussoni 12 Yana Vinogradova 13 Tinnu Sarvotham 14 Steven Macey 15
title The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities
spellingShingle The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities
Ronan Lyons
Sarah Rodgers
title_short The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities
title_full The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities
title_fullStr The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities
title_full_unstemmed The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities
title_sort The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities
author_id_str_mv 83efcf2a9dfcf8b55586999d3d152ac6
e81e94dea293640575619d15baf34a35
author_id_fullname_str_mv 83efcf2a9dfcf8b55586999d3d152ac6_***_Ronan Lyons
e81e94dea293640575619d15baf34a35_***_Sarah Rodgers
author Ronan Lyons
Sarah Rodgers
author2 Ronan Lyons
Denise Kendrick
Elizabeth M. L Towner
Carol Coupland
Mike Hayes
Nicola Christie
Judith Sleney
Sarah Jones
Richard Kimberlee
Sarah Rodgers
Samantha Turner
Mariana Brussoni
Yana Vinogradova
Tinnu Sarvotham
Steven Macey
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institution Swansea University
issn 1932-6203
doi_str_mv 10.1371/journal.pone.0060158
college_str Swansea University Medical School
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hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
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hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
url http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0060158
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description To determine whether advocacy targeted at local politicians leads to action to reduce the risk of pedestrian injury in deprived areas.A Cluster randomised controlled trial in 239 electoral wards in 57 local authorities in England and Wales with 617 elected local politicians.Intervention group politicians were provided with tailored information packs, including maps of casualty sites, numbers injured and a synopsis of effective interventions.25–30 months post intervention, primary outcomes included: electoral ward level: percentage of road traffic calmed; proportion with new interventions; school level: percentage with 20 mph zones, Safe Routes to School, pedestrian training or road safety education; politician level: percentage lobbying for safety measures. Secondary outcomes included politicians’ interest and involvement in injury prevention, and facilitators and barriers to implementation.Primary outcomes did not significantly differ: % difference in traffic calming (0.07, 95%CI: −0.07 to 0.20); proportion of schools with 20 mph zones (RR 1.47, 95%CI: 0.93 to 2.32), Safe Routes to School (RR 1.34, 95%CI: 0.83 to 2.17), pedestrian training (RR 1.23, 95%CI: 0.95 to 1.61) or other safety education (RR 1.16, 95%CI: 0.97 to 1.39). Intervention group politicians reported greater interest in child injury prevention (RR 1.09, 95%CI 1.03 to 1.16), belief in potential to help prevent injuries (RR 1.36, 95%CI 1.16 to 1.61), particularly pedestrian safety (RR 1.55, 95%CI 1.19 to 2.03). 63% of intervention politicians reported supporting new pedestrian safety schemes. The majority found the advocacy information surprising, interesting, effectively presented, and could identify suitable local interventions.This study demonstrates the feasibility of an innovative approach to translational public health by targeting local politicians in a randomised controlled trial. The intervention package was positively viewed and raised interest but changes in interventions were not statistically significance. Longer term supported advocacy may be needed.
published_date 2013-04-08T03:24:24Z
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