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Life cycle assessment of gas atomised sponge nickel for use in alkaline hydrogen fuel cell applications

Benjamin P Wilson, Nicholas Lavery Orcid Logo, David J Jarvis, Tomi Anttila, Jyri Rantanen, Stephen G.R Brown, Nicholas J Adkins, Steve Brown Orcid Logo

Journal of Power Sources, Volume: 243, Pages: 242 - 252

Swansea University Authors: Nicholas Lavery Orcid Logo, Steve Brown Orcid Logo

Abstract

This work represents the summary of the life cycle assessment of nickel aluminide intermetallic powders as used in the anodes of hydrogen fuel cells, work done for the IMPRESS FP6 project (2004 to 2009). NiAl intermetallics have good catalytic properties making them particularly useful for numerous...

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Published in: Journal of Power Sources
ISSN: 0378-7753
Published: 2013
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa15167
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2016-04-25T11:43:17.9946026</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>15167</id><entry>2013-07-05</entry><title>Life cycle assessment of gas atomised sponge nickel for use in alkaline hydrogen fuel cell applications</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>9f102ff59824fd4f7ce3d40144304395</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0953-5936</ORCID><firstname>Nicholas</firstname><surname>Lavery</surname><name>Nicholas Lavery</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>07a865adc76376646bc6c03a69ce35a9</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-0570-3018</ORCID><firstname>Steve</firstname><surname>Brown</surname><name>Steve Brown</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2013-07-05</date><deptcode>MECH</deptcode><abstract>This work represents the summary of the life cycle assessment of nickel aluminide intermetallic powders as used in the anodes of hydrogen fuel cells, work done for the IMPRESS FP6 project (2004 to 2009). NiAl intermetallics have good catalytic properties making them particularly useful for numerous hydrogenation reactions in the chemical industry, as well as electro-catalysts in alkaline fuel cells.The work in this paper represents the culmination of 5 years of data gathering from all the project partners, and the presentation and interpretation of the life cycle assessment of sponge nickel produced by gas atomisation for use in industrial hydrogenation catalysis applications, as compared to the conventional manufacturing route.The results predict that there would be an overall reduction in green house gas emissions of about 10% over the lifetime of the catalyst based on improvements in catalytic activity over the industrial standard baseline, assuming the best case scenario that any technical hurdles to a wide scale adoption were to be overcome. The adoption or penetration of the improved catalysts ultimately determines the realisable environmental benefits, but the work serves as an example of responsible product development where market drive and cost can go hand in hand with environmental improvements.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Power Sources</journal><volume>243</volume><paginationStart>242</paginationStart><paginationEnd>252</paginationEnd><publisher/><issnPrint>0378-7753</issnPrint><keywords>Sponge (Raney) nickel, Gas atomisation (GA), Platinum electrode</keywords><publishedDay>1</publishedDay><publishedMonth>12</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2013</publishedYear><publishedDate>2013-12-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1016/j.jpowsour.2013.05.186</doi><url>http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378775313009907</url><notes>This paper has only recently been accepted for publication in the Journal of Power Sources (5-year impact factor 5.006, 0 citations, Journal ranked 2nd in Electrochemistry), and represents the summary of the life cycle assessment of nickel aluminide intermetallic powders as used in the anodes of hydrogen fuel cells, work done for the IMPRESS FP6 project. The IMPRESS Integrated Project was a large pan-European "flagship" project in the field of applied material science which ran from 2004 until 2009. The project was managed by the European Space Agency and co-funded by the European Commission as part of the FP6 funding framework. IMPRESS comprised a large multi-disciplinary consortium of 40 research groups and companies, with a total 5-year budget of 41 million Euros, combining the expertise of 150+ leading scientists from 15 countries. (http://spaceflight.esa.int/impress/).The work is significant because it demonstrates the possibility and the massive impact of replacing platinum by nickel within the fuel cell. Company contact Tomy.Antila@hydrocel.com or David.J.Jarvis@esa.int.</notes><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Mechanical Engineering</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>MECH</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2016-04-25T11:43:17.9946026</lastEdited><Created>2013-07-05T11:41:49.9451613</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Engineering</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Benjamin P</firstname><surname>Wilson</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Nicholas</firstname><surname>Lavery</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0953-5936</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>David J</firstname><surname>Jarvis</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Tomi</firstname><surname>Anttila</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Jyri</firstname><surname>Rantanen</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Stephen G.R</firstname><surname>Brown</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Nicholas J</firstname><surname>Adkins</surname><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Steve</firstname><surname>Brown</surname><orcid>0000-0002-0570-3018</orcid><order>8</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0015167-30032016093215.pdf</filename><originalFilename>1-s2.0-S0378775313009907-main-final.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2016-03-30T09:32:15.5300000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>1439035</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><embargoDate>2016-03-30T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2016-04-25T11:43:17.9946026 v2 15167 2013-07-05 Life cycle assessment of gas atomised sponge nickel for use in alkaline hydrogen fuel cell applications 9f102ff59824fd4f7ce3d40144304395 0000-0003-0953-5936 Nicholas Lavery Nicholas Lavery true false 07a865adc76376646bc6c03a69ce35a9 0000-0002-0570-3018 Steve Brown Steve Brown true false 2013-07-05 MECH This work represents the summary of the life cycle assessment of nickel aluminide intermetallic powders as used in the anodes of hydrogen fuel cells, work done for the IMPRESS FP6 project (2004 to 2009). NiAl intermetallics have good catalytic properties making them particularly useful for numerous hydrogenation reactions in the chemical industry, as well as electro-catalysts in alkaline fuel cells.The work in this paper represents the culmination of 5 years of data gathering from all the project partners, and the presentation and interpretation of the life cycle assessment of sponge nickel produced by gas atomisation for use in industrial hydrogenation catalysis applications, as compared to the conventional manufacturing route.The results predict that there would be an overall reduction in green house gas emissions of about 10% over the lifetime of the catalyst based on improvements in catalytic activity over the industrial standard baseline, assuming the best case scenario that any technical hurdles to a wide scale adoption were to be overcome. The adoption or penetration of the improved catalysts ultimately determines the realisable environmental benefits, but the work serves as an example of responsible product development where market drive and cost can go hand in hand with environmental improvements. Journal Article Journal of Power Sources 243 242 252 0378-7753 Sponge (Raney) nickel, Gas atomisation (GA), Platinum electrode 1 12 2013 2013-12-01 10.1016/j.jpowsour.2013.05.186 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378775313009907 This paper has only recently been accepted for publication in the Journal of Power Sources (5-year impact factor 5.006, 0 citations, Journal ranked 2nd in Electrochemistry), and represents the summary of the life cycle assessment of nickel aluminide intermetallic powders as used in the anodes of hydrogen fuel cells, work done for the IMPRESS FP6 project. The IMPRESS Integrated Project was a large pan-European "flagship" project in the field of applied material science which ran from 2004 until 2009. The project was managed by the European Space Agency and co-funded by the European Commission as part of the FP6 funding framework. IMPRESS comprised a large multi-disciplinary consortium of 40 research groups and companies, with a total 5-year budget of 41 million Euros, combining the expertise of 150+ leading scientists from 15 countries. (http://spaceflight.esa.int/impress/).The work is significant because it demonstrates the possibility and the massive impact of replacing platinum by nickel within the fuel cell. Company contact Tomy.Antila@hydrocel.com or David.J.Jarvis@esa.int. COLLEGE NANME Mechanical Engineering COLLEGE CODE MECH Swansea University 2016-04-25T11:43:17.9946026 2013-07-05T11:41:49.9451613 College of Engineering Engineering Benjamin P Wilson 1 Nicholas Lavery 0000-0003-0953-5936 2 David J Jarvis 3 Tomi Anttila 4 Jyri Rantanen 5 Stephen G.R Brown 6 Nicholas J Adkins 7 Steve Brown 0000-0002-0570-3018 8 0015167-30032016093215.pdf 1-s2.0-S0378775313009907-main-final.pdf 2016-03-30T09:32:15.5300000 Output 1439035 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2016-03-30T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Life cycle assessment of gas atomised sponge nickel for use in alkaline hydrogen fuel cell applications
spellingShingle Life cycle assessment of gas atomised sponge nickel for use in alkaline hydrogen fuel cell applications
Nicholas Lavery
Steve Brown
title_short Life cycle assessment of gas atomised sponge nickel for use in alkaline hydrogen fuel cell applications
title_full Life cycle assessment of gas atomised sponge nickel for use in alkaline hydrogen fuel cell applications
title_fullStr Life cycle assessment of gas atomised sponge nickel for use in alkaline hydrogen fuel cell applications
title_full_unstemmed Life cycle assessment of gas atomised sponge nickel for use in alkaline hydrogen fuel cell applications
title_sort Life cycle assessment of gas atomised sponge nickel for use in alkaline hydrogen fuel cell applications
author_id_str_mv 9f102ff59824fd4f7ce3d40144304395
07a865adc76376646bc6c03a69ce35a9
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9f102ff59824fd4f7ce3d40144304395_***_Nicholas Lavery
07a865adc76376646bc6c03a69ce35a9_***_Steve Brown
author Nicholas Lavery
Steve Brown
author2 Benjamin P Wilson
Nicholas Lavery
David J Jarvis
Tomi Anttila
Jyri Rantanen
Stephen G.R Brown
Nicholas J Adkins
Steve Brown
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Power Sources
container_volume 243
container_start_page 242
publishDate 2013
institution Swansea University
issn 0378-7753
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.jpowsour.2013.05.186
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
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url http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378775313009907
document_store_str 1
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description This work represents the summary of the life cycle assessment of nickel aluminide intermetallic powders as used in the anodes of hydrogen fuel cells, work done for the IMPRESS FP6 project (2004 to 2009). NiAl intermetallics have good catalytic properties making them particularly useful for numerous hydrogenation reactions in the chemical industry, as well as electro-catalysts in alkaline fuel cells.The work in this paper represents the culmination of 5 years of data gathering from all the project partners, and the presentation and interpretation of the life cycle assessment of sponge nickel produced by gas atomisation for use in industrial hydrogenation catalysis applications, as compared to the conventional manufacturing route.The results predict that there would be an overall reduction in green house gas emissions of about 10% over the lifetime of the catalyst based on improvements in catalytic activity over the industrial standard baseline, assuming the best case scenario that any technical hurdles to a wide scale adoption were to be overcome. The adoption or penetration of the improved catalysts ultimately determines the realisable environmental benefits, but the work serves as an example of responsible product development where market drive and cost can go hand in hand with environmental improvements.
published_date 2013-12-01T03:24:44Z
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