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The importance of creep strain in linking together the Wilshire equations for minimum creep rates and times to various strains (including the rupture strain): An illustration using 1CrMoV rotor steel

Mark Evans Orcid Logo

Journal of Materials Science, Volume: 49, Issue: 1, Pages: 329 - 339

Swansea University Author: Mark Evans Orcid Logo

Abstract

This paper highlights the observation that the Wilshire equations for failure times and times to various strains, as reported in the original literature, may not be the most appropriate ones for all materials—including the one selected in this study. Further, such appropriateness can be determined b...

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Published in: Journal of Materials Science
ISSN: 0022-2461 1573-4803
Published: 2014
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa15696
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spelling 2020-06-17T13:14:10.1228164 v2 15696 2013-09-02 The importance of creep strain in linking together the Wilshire equations for minimum creep rates and times to various strains (including the rupture strain): An illustration using 1CrMoV rotor steel 7720f04c308cf7a1c32312058780d20c 0000-0003-2056-2396 Mark Evans Mark Evans true false 2013-09-02 MTLS This paper highlights the observation that the Wilshire equations for failure times and times to various strains, as reported in the original literature, may not be the most appropriate ones for all materials—including the one selected in this study. Further, such appropriateness can be determined by looking at the consistencies between the parameter estimates obtained using minimum creep rates in comparison to using failure times. It is shown, using 1CrMoV steel as an illustration, that the parameter consistency can be achieved by generalising the Monkman–Grant relation so that it contains a temperature correction. Indeed, the ability of the Wilshire equations to produce meaningful physical parameters, such as the activation energy, is shown to be highly dependent upon a valid specification for the Monkman–Grant relation. It is shown that variations in the measured values for some of the Wilshire parameters (w and k 3) with strain indicate that the causes of deformation are different at different strains and different stresses. Finally, the measured variations in the parameters of the Monkman–Grant relation with strain enable accurate interpolated and extrapolated creep curves to be calculated for any test condition. Journal Article Journal of Materials Science 49 1 329 339 0022-2461 1573-4803 31 1 2014 2014-01-31 10.1007/s10853-013-7709-7 COLLEGE NANME Materials Science and Engineering COLLEGE CODE MTLS Swansea University 2020-06-17T13:14:10.1228164 2013-09-02T16:48:06.8630679 College of Engineering Engineering Mark Evans 0000-0003-2056-2396 1 0015696-20122017143212.pdf 15696.pdf 2017-12-20T14:32:12.5800000 Output 875531 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2016-02-29T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title The importance of creep strain in linking together the Wilshire equations for minimum creep rates and times to various strains (including the rupture strain): An illustration using 1CrMoV rotor steel
spellingShingle The importance of creep strain in linking together the Wilshire equations for minimum creep rates and times to various strains (including the rupture strain): An illustration using 1CrMoV rotor steel
Mark Evans
title_short The importance of creep strain in linking together the Wilshire equations for minimum creep rates and times to various strains (including the rupture strain): An illustration using 1CrMoV rotor steel
title_full The importance of creep strain in linking together the Wilshire equations for minimum creep rates and times to various strains (including the rupture strain): An illustration using 1CrMoV rotor steel
title_fullStr The importance of creep strain in linking together the Wilshire equations for minimum creep rates and times to various strains (including the rupture strain): An illustration using 1CrMoV rotor steel
title_full_unstemmed The importance of creep strain in linking together the Wilshire equations for minimum creep rates and times to various strains (including the rupture strain): An illustration using 1CrMoV rotor steel
title_sort The importance of creep strain in linking together the Wilshire equations for minimum creep rates and times to various strains (including the rupture strain): An illustration using 1CrMoV rotor steel
author_id_str_mv 7720f04c308cf7a1c32312058780d20c
author_id_fullname_str_mv 7720f04c308cf7a1c32312058780d20c_***_Mark Evans
author Mark Evans
author2 Mark Evans
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Materials Science
container_volume 49
container_issue 1
container_start_page 329
publishDate 2014
institution Swansea University
issn 0022-2461
1573-4803
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s10853-013-7709-7
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description This paper highlights the observation that the Wilshire equations for failure times and times to various strains, as reported in the original literature, may not be the most appropriate ones for all materials—including the one selected in this study. Further, such appropriateness can be determined by looking at the consistencies between the parameter estimates obtained using minimum creep rates in comparison to using failure times. It is shown, using 1CrMoV steel as an illustration, that the parameter consistency can be achieved by generalising the Monkman–Grant relation so that it contains a temperature correction. Indeed, the ability of the Wilshire equations to produce meaningful physical parameters, such as the activation energy, is shown to be highly dependent upon a valid specification for the Monkman–Grant relation. It is shown that variations in the measured values for some of the Wilshire parameters (w and k 3) with strain indicate that the causes of deformation are different at different strains and different stresses. Finally, the measured variations in the parameters of the Monkman–Grant relation with strain enable accurate interpolated and extrapolated creep curves to be calculated for any test condition.
published_date 2014-01-31T03:25:13Z
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score 10.896665