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The Symbolism of the Eye of Horus in the Pyramid Texts / Samantha Edwards; Samantha Oakley

Swansea University Author: Samantha, Oakley

Abstract

The 5th and 6th Dynasty Pyramid Texts are the earliest extensive Egyptian religious texts from a royal mortuary context. This is our earliest evidence for the Eye of Horus; the aim of this study is to establish exactly what can be learned about its early usage as a symbol and to seek any hints about...

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Published: 1996
Online Access: http://shar.es/DIcSc
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa16459
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spelling 2014-06-12T10:14:23.0070000 v2 16459 2013-12-05 The Symbolism of the Eye of Horus in the Pyramid Texts a10acae3facddb3293551cd1465d68c4 0000-0002-6507-695X Samantha Oakley Samantha Oakley true false 2013-12-05 ILS The 5th and 6th Dynasty Pyramid Texts are the earliest extensive Egyptian religious texts from a royal mortuary context. This is our earliest evidence for the Eye of Horus; the aim of this study is to establish exactly what can be learned about its early usage as a symbol and to seek any hints about its origins. The spells mentioning the Eye of Horus are grouped by theme in the sections in Part One (eg. offering spells, ascension spells); references to the eyes of the king and other divine eyes are included for comparative purposes. There is a translation and commentary for each text; the grammar and context are evaluated. The chapters in Part Two contain discussions of the Eye of Horus' symbolism in the thematic groups. The Eye of Horus is supreme as a ritual, symbol for offerings presented to the läng by his son, Horus. The powers that the king gains from the Eye are the restoration of his faculties, transfiguration to a blessed spirit (3b) and a god; these are the general aims of the whole mortuary scenario. The king is also involved in the mythical fate of the Eye of Horus, namely its injury and restoration, as part of his ascension and integration into the afterlife. The role of other divine eyes in the PT and the significance attached to the king's eyes suggest strongly that the symbolic singular Eye of a god could be a succinct and transferable expression of his power. The many cross-cultural parallels of the eye as a source of power support this origin of divine eye symbolism in Egypt. The royal stature of Horus suggests why his Eye, in particular, achieved such prominence. Thesis Egyptology, Eye of Horus, Pyramid Texts, Old Kingdom, Ancient Egypt, myth 31 12 1996 1996-12-31 http://shar.es/DIcSc Available via the Ethos service. Published under maiden name (Samantha Edwards). COLLEGE NANME Library Services COLLEGE CODE ILS Swansea University 2018-03-29T13:10:55.8101095 2013-12-05T11:17:48.5434047 ISS Management Group Samantha Edwards 1 Samantha Oakley 0000-0002-6507-695X 2 0016459-12062014101423.pdf Thesis_SymbolismEyeHorus.pdf 2014-06-12T10:14:23.0070000 Output 24599620 application/pdf Version of Record true 2014-06-15T00:00:00.0000000 true
title The Symbolism of the Eye of Horus in the Pyramid Texts
spellingShingle The Symbolism of the Eye of Horus in the Pyramid Texts
Samantha, Oakley
title_short The Symbolism of the Eye of Horus in the Pyramid Texts
title_full The Symbolism of the Eye of Horus in the Pyramid Texts
title_fullStr The Symbolism of the Eye of Horus in the Pyramid Texts
title_full_unstemmed The Symbolism of the Eye of Horus in the Pyramid Texts
title_sort The Symbolism of the Eye of Horus in the Pyramid Texts
author_id_str_mv a10acae3facddb3293551cd1465d68c4
author_id_fullname_str_mv a10acae3facddb3293551cd1465d68c4_***_Samantha, Oakley
author Samantha, Oakley
author2 Samantha Edwards
Samantha Oakley
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description The 5th and 6th Dynasty Pyramid Texts are the earliest extensive Egyptian religious texts from a royal mortuary context. This is our earliest evidence for the Eye of Horus; the aim of this study is to establish exactly what can be learned about its early usage as a symbol and to seek any hints about its origins. The spells mentioning the Eye of Horus are grouped by theme in the sections in Part One (eg. offering spells, ascension spells); references to the eyes of the king and other divine eyes are included for comparative purposes. There is a translation and commentary for each text; the grammar and context are evaluated. The chapters in Part Two contain discussions of the Eye of Horus' symbolism in the thematic groups. The Eye of Horus is supreme as a ritual, symbol for offerings presented to the läng by his son, Horus. The powers that the king gains from the Eye are the restoration of his faculties, transfiguration to a blessed spirit (3b) and a god; these are the general aims of the whole mortuary scenario. The king is also involved in the mythical fate of the Eye of Horus, namely its injury and restoration, as part of his ascension and integration into the afterlife. The role of other divine eyes in the PT and the significance attached to the king's eyes suggest strongly that the symbolic singular Eye of a god could be a succinct and transferable expression of his power. The many cross-cultural parallels of the eye as a source of power support this origin of divine eye symbolism in Egypt. The royal stature of Horus suggests why his Eye, in particular, achieved such prominence.
published_date 1996-12-31T03:28:19Z
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