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Motion as a cue to face recognition: Evidence from congenital prosopagnosia / Christopher A Longmore; Jeremy J Tree

Neuropsychologia, Volume: 51, Issue: 5, Pages: 864 - 875

Swansea University Author: Tree, Jeremy

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DOI (Published version): 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.01.022

Abstract

Congenital prosopagnosia is a condition that, present from an early age, makes it difficult for an individual to recognise someone from his or her face. Typically, research into prosopagnosia has employed static images that do not contain the extra information we can obtain from moving faces and, as...

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Published in: Neuropsychologia
Published: 2013
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa16864
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Abstract: Congenital prosopagnosia is a condition that, present from an early age, makes it difficult for an individual to recognise someone from his or her face. Typically, research into prosopagnosia has employed static images that do not contain the extra information we can obtain from moving faces and, as a result, very little is known about the role of facial motion for identity processing in prosopagnosia. Two experiments comparing the performance of four congenital prosopagnosics with that of age matched and younger controls on their ability to learn and recognise (Experiment 1) and match (Experiment 2) novel faces are reported. It was found that younger controls' recognition memory performance increased with dynamic presentation, however only one of the four prosopagnosics showed any improvement. Motion aided matching performance of age matched controls and all prosopagnosics. In addition, the face inversion effect, an effect that tends to be reduced in prosopagnosia, emerged when prosopagnosics matched moving faces. The results suggest that facial motion can be used as a cue to identity, but that this may be a complex and difficult cue to retain. As prosopagnosics performance improved with the dynamic presentation of faces it would appear that prosopagnosics can use motion as a cue to recognition, and the different patterns for the face inversion effect that occurred in the prosopagnosics for static and dynamic faces suggests that the mechanisms used for dynamic facial motion recognition are dissociable from static mechanisms.
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 5
Start Page: 864
End Page: 875