No Cover Image

Journal article 688 views

The Continuation of Prejudice: Addressing Negative Attitudes in Nurse Training and Continuing Professional Education / Paul, Nash

Educational Gerontology, Volume: 40, Issue: 1, Pages: 53 - 60

Swansea University Author: Paul, Nash

Full text not available from this repository: check for access using links below.

DOI (Published version): 10.1080/03601277.2013.768084

Abstract

Measures of attitudes to ageing typically examine only explicit attitudes, treatingattitude holders as a homogeneous group with regards to education levels. Implicitattitudes (i.e. the immediate attitudinal response before conscious processes amendthat attitude to an explicit attitude) have been les...

Full description

Published in: Educational Gerontology
Published: 2014
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa17252
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2014-02-06T03:06:01Z
last_indexed 2018-02-09T04:50:42Z
id cronfa17252
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2017-09-20T15:49:49.5189913</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>17252</id><entry>2014-02-05</entry><title>The Continuation of Prejudice: Addressing Negative Attitudes in Nurse Training and Continuing Professional Education</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>d17c45021e08bb4588d90d0d656af536</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-2974-2046</ORCID><firstname>Paul</firstname><surname>Nash</surname><name>Paul Nash</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2014-02-05</date><deptcode>HIA</deptcode><abstract>Measures of attitudes to ageing typically examine only explicit attitudes, treatingattitude holders as a homogeneous group with regards to education levels. Implicitattitudes (i.e. the immediate attitudinal response before conscious processes amendthat attitude to an explicit attitude) have been less commonly examined. The currentstudy examined both explicit and implicit attitudes towards ageing in four groups:nurses with high exposure to older patients; nurses with exposure to a broader patientage range; nursing students at the start of training and nursing students at the end oftraining. There were no significant differences in explicit attitudes, but implicitattitudes were significantly less negative in the student groups relative to thepracticing nurses groups. The argument that training and experience have little effecton attitudes is discussed.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Educational Gerontology</journal><volume>40</volume><journalNumber>1</journalNumber><paginationStart>53</paginationStart><paginationEnd>60</paginationEnd><publisher/><keywords>Ageing, Prejudice, Ageism, Education, Nursing, Implicit Cognition,</keywords><publishedDay>31</publishedDay><publishedMonth>12</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2014</publishedYear><publishedDate>2014-12-31</publishedDate><doi>10.1080/03601277.2013.768084</doi><url/><notes></notes><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Centre for Innovative Ageing</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>HIA</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><lastEdited>2017-09-20T15:49:49.5189913</lastEdited><Created>2014-02-05T08:39:15.6380320</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Nursing</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Paul</firstname><surname>Nash</surname><orcid>0000-0002-2974-2046</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Ian</firstname><surname>Stuart-Hamilton</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Peter</firstname><surname>Mayer</surname><order>3</order></author></authors><documents/><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2017-09-20T15:49:49.5189913 v2 17252 2014-02-05 The Continuation of Prejudice: Addressing Negative Attitudes in Nurse Training and Continuing Professional Education d17c45021e08bb4588d90d0d656af536 0000-0002-2974-2046 Paul Nash Paul Nash true false 2014-02-05 HIA Measures of attitudes to ageing typically examine only explicit attitudes, treatingattitude holders as a homogeneous group with regards to education levels. Implicitattitudes (i.e. the immediate attitudinal response before conscious processes amendthat attitude to an explicit attitude) have been less commonly examined. The currentstudy examined both explicit and implicit attitudes towards ageing in four groups:nurses with high exposure to older patients; nurses with exposure to a broader patientage range; nursing students at the start of training and nursing students at the end oftraining. There were no significant differences in explicit attitudes, but implicitattitudes were significantly less negative in the student groups relative to thepracticing nurses groups. The argument that training and experience have little effecton attitudes is discussed. Journal Article Educational Gerontology 40 1 53 60 Ageing, Prejudice, Ageism, Education, Nursing, Implicit Cognition, 31 12 2014 2014-12-31 10.1080/03601277.2013.768084 COLLEGE NANME Centre for Innovative Ageing COLLEGE CODE HIA Swansea University 2017-09-20T15:49:49.5189913 2014-02-05T08:39:15.6380320 College of Human and Health Sciences Nursing Paul Nash 0000-0002-2974-2046 1 Ian Stuart-Hamilton 2 Peter Mayer 3
title The Continuation of Prejudice: Addressing Negative Attitudes in Nurse Training and Continuing Professional Education
spellingShingle The Continuation of Prejudice: Addressing Negative Attitudes in Nurse Training and Continuing Professional Education
Paul, Nash
title_short The Continuation of Prejudice: Addressing Negative Attitudes in Nurse Training and Continuing Professional Education
title_full The Continuation of Prejudice: Addressing Negative Attitudes in Nurse Training and Continuing Professional Education
title_fullStr The Continuation of Prejudice: Addressing Negative Attitudes in Nurse Training and Continuing Professional Education
title_full_unstemmed The Continuation of Prejudice: Addressing Negative Attitudes in Nurse Training and Continuing Professional Education
title_sort The Continuation of Prejudice: Addressing Negative Attitudes in Nurse Training and Continuing Professional Education
author_id_str_mv d17c45021e08bb4588d90d0d656af536
author_id_fullname_str_mv d17c45021e08bb4588d90d0d656af536_***_Paul, Nash
author Paul, Nash
format Journal article
container_title Educational Gerontology
container_volume 40
container_issue 1
container_start_page 53
publishDate 2014
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1080/03601277.2013.768084
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Nursing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Nursing
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description Measures of attitudes to ageing typically examine only explicit attitudes, treatingattitude holders as a homogeneous group with regards to education levels. Implicitattitudes (i.e. the immediate attitudinal response before conscious processes amendthat attitude to an explicit attitude) have been less commonly examined. The currentstudy examined both explicit and implicit attitudes towards ageing in four groups:nurses with high exposure to older patients; nurses with exposure to a broader patientage range; nursing students at the start of training and nursing students at the end oftraining. There were no significant differences in explicit attitudes, but implicitattitudes were significantly less negative in the student groups relative to thepracticing nurses groups. The argument that training and experience have little effecton attitudes is discussed.
published_date 2014-12-31T03:31:23Z
_version_ 1674513254835027968
score 10.740703