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Reinventing the Sublime: Post-Romantic Literature and Theory / Steven, Vine

Pages: 1 - 201

Swansea University Author: Steven, Vine

Abstract

The book examines mutations of the sublime in Romantic, modern and postmodern texts, and the return of the sublime in recent critical and cultural theory. For the Romantics, the sublime confirmed and prostrated the self by confronting it with what the self could not surmount; the book begins by argu...

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Published: Sussex Academic Press Brighton 2013
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa17971
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first_indexed 2014-05-16T01:30:04Z
last_indexed 2018-02-09T04:52:06Z
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spelling 2014-05-15T15:33:15.5944531 v2 17971 2014-05-15 Reinventing the Sublime: Post-Romantic Literature and Theory 8adad05ceecbaab7f4b2be512149b4d7 Steven Vine Steven Vine true false 2014-05-15 AELC The book examines mutations of the sublime in Romantic, modern and postmodern texts, and the return of the sublime in recent critical and cultural theory. For the Romantics, the sublime confirmed and prostrated the self by confronting it with what the self could not surmount; the book begins by arguing that Blake, Mary Shelley and Thomas De Quincey present a sublime that does not underwrite the self, but puts it into anxious relationship to matter, time and power. It argues that the modernists locate the sublime not in embattled subjectivity, but elusive alterity: T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf and Djuna Barnes face the excess of the modern in a language of intensity, disjunction and elusiveness. The final part of the book contends that the historical conditions of capital, the Shoah and slavery engender a postmodern sublime of temporality, and that Thomas Pynchon, D.M. Thomas and Toni Morrison dramatize the exorbitance of the ‘event.’ Throughout, the sublime is read as a language of ‘invention’ – taking the Latin meaning of to ‘come upon,’ ‘find,’ ‘discover’ – that involves an encounter with the surprising or unknown, and submits meaning and selfhood to reinvention. Book 1 201 Brighton Sussex Academic Press 29 8 2013 2013-08-29 COLLEGE NANME English Literature & Creative Writing COLLEGE CODE AELC Swansea University 2014-05-15T15:33:15.5944531 2014-05-15T15:33:01.6066113 College of Arts and Humanities English Language and Literature Steven Vine 1
title Reinventing the Sublime: Post-Romantic Literature and Theory
spellingShingle Reinventing the Sublime: Post-Romantic Literature and Theory
Steven, Vine
title_short Reinventing the Sublime: Post-Romantic Literature and Theory
title_full Reinventing the Sublime: Post-Romantic Literature and Theory
title_fullStr Reinventing the Sublime: Post-Romantic Literature and Theory
title_full_unstemmed Reinventing the Sublime: Post-Romantic Literature and Theory
title_sort Reinventing the Sublime: Post-Romantic Literature and Theory
author_id_str_mv 8adad05ceecbaab7f4b2be512149b4d7
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8adad05ceecbaab7f4b2be512149b4d7_***_Steven, Vine
author Steven, Vine
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publishDate 2013
institution Swansea University
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description The book examines mutations of the sublime in Romantic, modern and postmodern texts, and the return of the sublime in recent critical and cultural theory. For the Romantics, the sublime confirmed and prostrated the self by confronting it with what the self could not surmount; the book begins by arguing that Blake, Mary Shelley and Thomas De Quincey present a sublime that does not underwrite the self, but puts it into anxious relationship to matter, time and power. It argues that the modernists locate the sublime not in embattled subjectivity, but elusive alterity: T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf and Djuna Barnes face the excess of the modern in a language of intensity, disjunction and elusiveness. The final part of the book contends that the historical conditions of capital, the Shoah and slavery engender a postmodern sublime of temporality, and that Thomas Pynchon, D.M. Thomas and Toni Morrison dramatize the exorbitance of the ‘event.’ Throughout, the sublime is read as a language of ‘invention’ – taking the Latin meaning of to ‘come upon,’ ‘find,’ ‘discover’ – that involves an encounter with the surprising or unknown, and submits meaning and selfhood to reinvention.
published_date 2013-08-29T03:33:44Z
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