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Evidence of land-sea transfer of the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter to a wildlife marine sentinel species / Johanna Baily; Guillaume Meric; Sion Bayliss; Geoffrey Foster; Simon Moss; Eleanor Watson; Ben Pascoe; Jane Mikhail; Romain Pizzi; Robert Goldstone; David Smith; Kim Willoughby; Ailsa Hall; Samuel Sheppard; Mark Dagleish

Molecular Ecology

Swansea University Authors: Guillaume, Meric, Ben, Pascoe, Jane, Mikhail

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/mec.13001

Abstract

Environmental pollution often accompanies the expansion and urbanisation of human populations and sewage and wastewaters commonly impact upon marine environments. Here we explored the potential for faecal bacterial pathogens, of anthropic origin, to spread to marine wildlife in coastal areas. The co...

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Published in: Molecular Ecology
Published: 2014
Online Access: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25401947
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa18743
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spelling 2014-11-20T08:17:23.2735003 v2 18743 2014-10-16 Evidence of land-sea transfer of the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter to a wildlife marine sentinel species 9384e450ee619395be7459d6bd7a8f6d Guillaume Meric Guillaume Meric true false 4660c0eb7e6bfd796cd749ae713ea558 0000-0001-6376-5121 Ben Pascoe Ben Pascoe true false f3806e5ff186dc9a67518a780ebff675 Jane Mikhail Jane Mikhail true false 2014-10-16 PMSC Environmental pollution often accompanies the expansion and urbanisation of human populations and sewage and wastewaters commonly impact upon marine environments. Here we explored the potential for faecal bacterial pathogens, of anthropic origin, to spread to marine wildlife in coastal areas. The common zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter was isolated from grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) – an important sentinel species for environmental pollution – and compared to isolates from wild birds, agricultural sources and clinical samples to characterize possible transmission routes. Campylobacter jejuni was present in half of all grey seal pups sampled (24/50 dead and 46/90 live pups) in the breeding colony on the Isle of May (Scotland), where it was frequently associated with histological evidence of disease. Returning yearling animals (19/19) were negative for C. jejuni suggesting clearance of infection whilst away from the localised colony infection source. The genomes of 90 isolates from seals were sequenced and characterized using a whole-genome MLST approach, and compared to 192 published genomes from multiple sources using population genetic approaches and a probabilistic genetic attribution model to infer the source of infection from MLST data. The strong genotype-host association has enabled the application of source attribution models in epidemiological studies of human campylobacteriosis, and here assignment analyses consistently grouped seal isolates withthose from human clinical samples. These findings are consistent with either a common infection source or direct transmission of human campylobacter to grey seals, raising concerns about the spread of human pathogens to wildlife marine sentinel species in coastalareas. Journal Article Molecular Ecology environmental health, Campylobacter, grey seals, source attribution, genomics 17 11 2014 2014-11-17 10.1111/mec.13001 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25401947 COLLEGE NANME Medicine COLLEGE CODE PMSC Swansea University 2014-11-20T08:17:23.2735003 2014-10-16T21:35:25.7464013 Swansea University Medical School Medicine Johanna Baily 1 Guillaume Meric 2 Sion Bayliss 3 Geoffrey Foster 4 Simon Moss 5 Eleanor Watson 6 Ben Pascoe 0000-0001-6376-5121 7 Jane Mikhail 8 Romain Pizzi 9 Robert Goldstone 10 David Smith 11 Kim Willoughby 12 Ailsa Hall 13 Samuel Sheppard 14 Mark Dagleish 15
title Evidence of land-sea transfer of the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter to a wildlife marine sentinel species
spellingShingle Evidence of land-sea transfer of the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter to a wildlife marine sentinel species
Guillaume, Meric
Ben, Pascoe
Jane, Mikhail
title_short Evidence of land-sea transfer of the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter to a wildlife marine sentinel species
title_full Evidence of land-sea transfer of the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter to a wildlife marine sentinel species
title_fullStr Evidence of land-sea transfer of the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter to a wildlife marine sentinel species
title_full_unstemmed Evidence of land-sea transfer of the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter to a wildlife marine sentinel species
title_sort Evidence of land-sea transfer of the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter to a wildlife marine sentinel species
author_id_str_mv 9384e450ee619395be7459d6bd7a8f6d
4660c0eb7e6bfd796cd749ae713ea558
f3806e5ff186dc9a67518a780ebff675
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9384e450ee619395be7459d6bd7a8f6d_***_Guillaume, Meric
4660c0eb7e6bfd796cd749ae713ea558_***_Ben, Pascoe
f3806e5ff186dc9a67518a780ebff675_***_Jane, Mikhail
author Guillaume, Meric
Ben, Pascoe
Jane, Mikhail
author2 Johanna Baily
Guillaume Meric
Sion Bayliss
Geoffrey Foster
Simon Moss
Eleanor Watson
Ben Pascoe
Jane Mikhail
Romain Pizzi
Robert Goldstone
David Smith
Kim Willoughby
Ailsa Hall
Samuel Sheppard
Mark Dagleish
format Journal article
container_title Molecular Ecology
publishDate 2014
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1111/mec.13001
college_str Swansea University Medical School
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
hierarchy_parent_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25401947
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description Environmental pollution often accompanies the expansion and urbanisation of human populations and sewage and wastewaters commonly impact upon marine environments. Here we explored the potential for faecal bacterial pathogens, of anthropic origin, to spread to marine wildlife in coastal areas. The common zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter was isolated from grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) – an important sentinel species for environmental pollution – and compared to isolates from wild birds, agricultural sources and clinical samples to characterize possible transmission routes. Campylobacter jejuni was present in half of all grey seal pups sampled (24/50 dead and 46/90 live pups) in the breeding colony on the Isle of May (Scotland), where it was frequently associated with histological evidence of disease. Returning yearling animals (19/19) were negative for C. jejuni suggesting clearance of infection whilst away from the localised colony infection source. The genomes of 90 isolates from seals were sequenced and characterized using a whole-genome MLST approach, and compared to 192 published genomes from multiple sources using population genetic approaches and a probabilistic genetic attribution model to infer the source of infection from MLST data. The strong genotype-host association has enabled the application of source attribution models in epidemiological studies of human campylobacteriosis, and here assignment analyses consistently grouped seal isolates withthose from human clinical samples. These findings are consistent with either a common infection source or direct transmission of human campylobacter to grey seals, raising concerns about the spread of human pathogens to wildlife marine sentinel species in coastalareas.
published_date 2014-11-17T03:30:42Z
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