No Cover Image

Journal article 451 views 94 downloads

Using a deformable discrete-element technique to model the compaction behaviour of mixed ductile and brittle particulate systems / Rajesh Ransing; Roland W. Lewis; David Gethin

PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON SERIES A-MATHEMATICAL PHYSICAL AND ENGINEERING SCIENCES, Volume: 362, Issue: 1822, Pages: 1867 - 1884

Swansea University Authors: Rajesh, Ransing, David, Gethin

DOI (Published version): 10.1098/rsta.2004.1421

Abstract

This paper illustrates the application of a combined discrete- and finite-element simulation to the compaction of assemblies comprising both ductile and brittle particles. Through case studies, the results demonstrate the importance of using a fine mesh on the particle boundary, the effect of fragme...

Full description

Published in: PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON SERIES A-MATHEMATICAL PHYSICAL AND ENGINEERING SCIENCES
Published: 2004
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa1963
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: This paper illustrates the application of a combined discrete- and finite-element simulation to the compaction of assemblies comprising both ductile and brittle particles. Through case studies, the results demonstrate the importance of using a fine mesh on the particle boundary, the effect of fragmentation and its impact on the form of the compression curve, and the effect of inclusion of ductile particles at ca. 25% by volume suppressing brittle failure mechanisms. Although, the calculations can be extended to three dimensions, the computational cost is a current limitation on such calculations. The novelty of this approach is in its ability to predict material yield surfaces for the compaction of a mixture of particles. The initial results are optimistic, but there is a need for model improvement, principally through the ability to capture the random packing of irregular particles since this will eliminate a key problem in defining an initial density for the simulation. The main advantage of this technology is in its ability to minimize the need for expensive triaxial testing of samples to develop the yield-surface history.
Keywords: discrete-element method; finite-element method; ductile and brittle particles; compaction; yield surfaces, powder compaction
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 1822
Start Page: 1867
End Page: 1884