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Philanthropy and Deafness in Wales, 1847–1914 / Michael Mantin

Welsh History Review, Volume: 27, Issue: 2, Pages: 282 - 309

Swansea University Author: Mantin, Mike

Abstract

Most deaf institutions that were established in the nineteenth century operated on a voluntary basis, relying on charitable donations to survive. These institutions, and thus the deaf pupils who were educated in them, were drawn into the discourses of nationality, gender and religion which came with...

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Published in: Welsh History Review
Published: 2014
Online Access: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/uwp/whis/2014/00000027/00000002/art00004?token=004f1e2d5ed35d5a296bff437a63736a6f35474621586625777023446f642f4642f58bc25fbc248
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa20004
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Abstract: Most deaf institutions that were established in the nineteenth century operated on a voluntary basis, relying on charitable donations to survive. These institutions, and thus the deaf pupils who were educated in them, were drawn into the discourses of nationality, gender and religion which came with their reliance on an interconnected local philanthropic elite. This article examines how the Cambrian Institution for the Deaf and Dumb in Swansea – Wales's first deaf institution – took part in these philanthropic debates, explores the specific Welsh dimension to them and examines how its methods of philanthropy created a distinctive construction of deafness.
Keywords: disability history, deaf history, history of special education, philanthropy, voluntary action history
College: College of Arts and Humanities
Issue: 2
Start Page: 282
End Page: 309