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Journal article 668 views 118 downloads

The other-race effect in perception and recognition: Insights from the complete composite task. / Ruth, Horry

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Volume: 41, Issue: 2, Pages: 508 - 524

Swansea University Author: Ruth, Horry

DOI (Published version): 10.1037/xhp0000042

Abstract

People are more accurate at recognizing faces of their own race than faces from other races, a phenomenon known as the other-race effect. Other-race effects have also been reported in some perceptual tasks. Across three experiments, White and Chinese participants completed recognition tests as well...

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Published in: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Published: 2015
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa20295
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spelling 2019-06-19T16:28:41.2511972 v2 20295 2015-03-11 The other-race effect in perception and recognition: Insights from the complete composite task. ea243bc0327bc0213c076bda1fe85f10 0000-0003-3105-3781 Ruth Horry Ruth Horry true false 2015-03-11 HPS People are more accurate at recognizing faces of their own race than faces from other races, a phenomenon known as the other-race effect. Other-race effects have also been reported in some perceptual tasks. Across three experiments, White and Chinese participants completed recognition tests as well as the complete paradigm of the composite task, which measures participants’ abilities to selectively attend to the target region of a face while ignoring the task-irrelevant region of the face. Each task was completed with both own- and other-race faces. At a group level, participants showed significant own-race effects in recognition, but not in the composite task. At an individual difference level, the results provided no support for the hypothesis that a deficit in holistic processing for other-race faces drives the other-race effect in recognition. We therefore conclude that the other-race effect in recognition is not driven by the processes that underpin the composite effect. Journal Article Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 41 2 508 524 Face perception; holistic processing; composite task; other-race effect; own-race bias 1 1 2015 2015-01-01 10.1037/xhp0000042 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University 2019-06-19T16:28:41.2511972 2015-03-11T10:02:51.8152352 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Ruth Horry 0000-0003-3105-3781 1 Winnee Cheong 2 Neil Brewer 3 0020295-02042015091648.pdf Horry__Cheong__Brewer__2015__JEP__HPP.pdf 2015-04-02T09:11:29.1670000 Output 1165391 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2015-04-02T00:00:00.0000000 true
title The other-race effect in perception and recognition: Insights from the complete composite task.
spellingShingle The other-race effect in perception and recognition: Insights from the complete composite task.
Ruth, Horry
title_short The other-race effect in perception and recognition: Insights from the complete composite task.
title_full The other-race effect in perception and recognition: Insights from the complete composite task.
title_fullStr The other-race effect in perception and recognition: Insights from the complete composite task.
title_full_unstemmed The other-race effect in perception and recognition: Insights from the complete composite task.
title_sort The other-race effect in perception and recognition: Insights from the complete composite task.
author_id_str_mv ea243bc0327bc0213c076bda1fe85f10
author_id_fullname_str_mv ea243bc0327bc0213c076bda1fe85f10_***_Ruth, Horry
author Ruth, Horry
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
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publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1037/xhp0000042
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
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description People are more accurate at recognizing faces of their own race than faces from other races, a phenomenon known as the other-race effect. Other-race effects have also been reported in some perceptual tasks. Across three experiments, White and Chinese participants completed recognition tests as well as the complete paradigm of the composite task, which measures participants’ abilities to selectively attend to the target region of a face while ignoring the task-irrelevant region of the face. Each task was completed with both own- and other-race faces. At a group level, participants showed significant own-race effects in recognition, but not in the composite task. At an individual difference level, the results provided no support for the hypothesis that a deficit in holistic processing for other-race faces drives the other-race effect in recognition. We therefore conclude that the other-race effect in recognition is not driven by the processes that underpin the composite effect.
published_date 2015-01-01T18:45:53Z
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