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Using community metabolomics as a new approach to discriminate marine microbial particulate organic matter in the western English Channel / Carole Llewellyn, Ulf Sommer, Chris L. Dupont, Andrew E. Allen, Mark R. Viant

Progress in Oceanography, Volume: 137, Pages: 421 - 433

Swansea University Author: Carole Llewellyn

DOI (Published version): 10.1016/j.pocean.2015.04.022

Abstract

Metabolomics provides an unbiased assessment of a wide range of metabolites and is an emerging ‘omics technique in the marine sciences. Here we use ‘non-targeted’ community metabolomics to determine patterns in metabolite profiles associated with particulate organic matter (POM) from two long-term m...

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Published in: Progress in Oceanography
Published: 2015
Online Access: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0079661115000890
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa20537
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2015-10-05T11:10:35.6028039</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>20537</id><entry>2015-03-25</entry><title>Using community metabolomics as a new approach to discriminate marine microbial particulate organic matter in the western English Channel</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>bcd94bda79ebf4c2c82d82dfb027a140</sid><ORCID/><firstname>Carole</firstname><surname>Llewellyn</surname><name>Carole Llewellyn</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2015-03-25</date><deptcode>SBI</deptcode><abstract>Metabolomics provides an unbiased assessment of a wide range of metabolites and is an emerging &#x2018;omics technique in the marine sciences. Here we use &#x2018;non-targeted&#x2019; community metabolomics to determine patterns in metabolite profiles associated with particulate organic matter (POM) from two long-term monitoring stations in the western English Channel (station L4; 50&#xB0; 15&#x2032;N, 4&#xB0; 13&#x2032;W and E1; 50&#xB0; 02&#x2032;N, 4&#xB0; 22&#x2032;W). Particulates, composed of mainly phytoplankton, were sampled from the two stations during May 2009 by filtering onto glass fibre filters (&amp;#62; 0.7 &#x3BC;m to &amp;#60; 200 &#x3BC;m) from surface waters and from below thermocline. The polar metabolite fraction was measured using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS), and the lipid fraction by direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS), these were then analysed to statistically compare their distributions. Results show significantly different profiles of metabolites across the four locations with the largest differences for both the polar and lipid fractions found between the two stations relative to the smaller differences associated with depth. We putatively annotate the most discriminant metabolites revealing a range of amino-acid derivatives, diacylglyceryltrimethylhomoserine (DGTS) lipids, oxidised fatty acids (oxylipins), glycosylated compounds, oligohexoses, phospholipids, triacylglycerides (TAGs) and oxidised TAGs. The majority of the polar metabolites were most abundant in the surface waters at L4 and least abundant in the deep waters at E1 (E1-70m). In contrast, the oxidised TAGS were most abundant at E1, particularly at E1-70m. Differentiated metabolites are discussed in relation to supporting data on nutrients, carbon and chlorophyll, and to metatranscriptome-derived phytoplankton taxonomy. Our results show for the first time the power of community metabolomics in discriminating metabolite patterns associated with marine POM.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Progress in Oceanography</journal><volume>137</volume><paginationStart>421</paginationStart><paginationEnd>433</paginationEnd><publisher/><keywords>Meta-metabolomics; polar metabolites; lipidomics; Direct Infusion Mass Spectrometry; particulate organic matter; marine microbes; phytoplankton; UK-western English Channel.</keywords><publishedDay>31</publishedDay><publishedMonth>5</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2015</publishedYear><publishedDate>2015-05-31</publishedDate><doi>10.1016/j.pocean.2015.04.022</doi><url>http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0079661115000890</url><notes>Metabolomics is an increasingly important technique across many disciplines. It is not yet widely used in the aquatic research. This paper is important because it is the first time that community metabolomics has been used to discriminate marine microbial populations. Our results show for the first time the power of community metabolomics in discriminating metabolite patterns associated with marine POM.</notes><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Biosciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>SBI</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2015-10-05T11:10:35.6028039</lastEdited><Created>2015-03-25T16:35:11.6230451</Created><path><level id="1">College of Science</level><level id="2">Biosciences</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Carole</firstname><surname>Llewellyn</surname><orcid/><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Ulf</firstname><surname>Sommer</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Chris L.</firstname><surname>Dupont</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Andrew E.</firstname><surname>Allen</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Mark R.</firstname><surname>Viant</surname><order>5</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0020537-05102015110821.pdf</filename><originalFilename>1-s2.0-S0079661115000890-main.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2015-10-05T11:08:21.6300000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>1392055</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Enhanced Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><embargoDate>2015-10-04T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><documentNotes/><copyrightCorrect>false</copyrightCorrect></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2015-10-05T11:10:35.6028039 v2 20537 2015-03-25 Using community metabolomics as a new approach to discriminate marine microbial particulate organic matter in the western English Channel bcd94bda79ebf4c2c82d82dfb027a140 Carole Llewellyn Carole Llewellyn true false 2015-03-25 SBI Metabolomics provides an unbiased assessment of a wide range of metabolites and is an emerging ‘omics technique in the marine sciences. Here we use ‘non-targeted’ community metabolomics to determine patterns in metabolite profiles associated with particulate organic matter (POM) from two long-term monitoring stations in the western English Channel (station L4; 50° 15′N, 4° 13′W and E1; 50° 02′N, 4° 22′W). Particulates, composed of mainly phytoplankton, were sampled from the two stations during May 2009 by filtering onto glass fibre filters (&#62; 0.7 μm to &#60; 200 μm) from surface waters and from below thermocline. The polar metabolite fraction was measured using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS), and the lipid fraction by direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS), these were then analysed to statistically compare their distributions. Results show significantly different profiles of metabolites across the four locations with the largest differences for both the polar and lipid fractions found between the two stations relative to the smaller differences associated with depth. We putatively annotate the most discriminant metabolites revealing a range of amino-acid derivatives, diacylglyceryltrimethylhomoserine (DGTS) lipids, oxidised fatty acids (oxylipins), glycosylated compounds, oligohexoses, phospholipids, triacylglycerides (TAGs) and oxidised TAGs. The majority of the polar metabolites were most abundant in the surface waters at L4 and least abundant in the deep waters at E1 (E1-70m). In contrast, the oxidised TAGS were most abundant at E1, particularly at E1-70m. Differentiated metabolites are discussed in relation to supporting data on nutrients, carbon and chlorophyll, and to metatranscriptome-derived phytoplankton taxonomy. Our results show for the first time the power of community metabolomics in discriminating metabolite patterns associated with marine POM. Journal Article Progress in Oceanography 137 421 433 Meta-metabolomics; polar metabolites; lipidomics; Direct Infusion Mass Spectrometry; particulate organic matter; marine microbes; phytoplankton; UK-western English Channel. 31 5 2015 2015-05-31 10.1016/j.pocean.2015.04.022 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0079661115000890 Metabolomics is an increasingly important technique across many disciplines. It is not yet widely used in the aquatic research. This paper is important because it is the first time that community metabolomics has been used to discriminate marine microbial populations. Our results show for the first time the power of community metabolomics in discriminating metabolite patterns associated with marine POM. COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2015-10-05T11:10:35.6028039 2015-03-25T16:35:11.6230451 College of Science Biosciences Carole Llewellyn 1 Ulf Sommer 2 Chris L. Dupont 3 Andrew E. Allen 4 Mark R. Viant 5 0020537-05102015110821.pdf 1-s2.0-S0079661115000890-main.pdf 2015-10-05T11:08:21.6300000 Output 1392055 application/pdf Enhanced Version of Record true 2015-10-04T00:00:00.0000000 false
title Using community metabolomics as a new approach to discriminate marine microbial particulate organic matter in the western English Channel
spellingShingle Using community metabolomics as a new approach to discriminate marine microbial particulate organic matter in the western English Channel
Carole, Llewellyn
title_short Using community metabolomics as a new approach to discriminate marine microbial particulate organic matter in the western English Channel
title_full Using community metabolomics as a new approach to discriminate marine microbial particulate organic matter in the western English Channel
title_fullStr Using community metabolomics as a new approach to discriminate marine microbial particulate organic matter in the western English Channel
title_full_unstemmed Using community metabolomics as a new approach to discriminate marine microbial particulate organic matter in the western English Channel
title_sort Using community metabolomics as a new approach to discriminate marine microbial particulate organic matter in the western English Channel
author_id_str_mv bcd94bda79ebf4c2c82d82dfb027a140
author_id_fullname_str_mv bcd94bda79ebf4c2c82d82dfb027a140_***_Carole, Llewellyn
author Carole, Llewellyn
author2 Carole Llewellyn
Ulf Sommer
Chris L. Dupont
Andrew E. Allen
Mark R. Viant
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container_title Progress in Oceanography
container_volume 137
container_start_page 421
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.pocean.2015.04.022
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
url http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0079661115000890
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description Metabolomics provides an unbiased assessment of a wide range of metabolites and is an emerging ‘omics technique in the marine sciences. Here we use ‘non-targeted’ community metabolomics to determine patterns in metabolite profiles associated with particulate organic matter (POM) from two long-term monitoring stations in the western English Channel (station L4; 50° 15′N, 4° 13′W and E1; 50° 02′N, 4° 22′W). Particulates, composed of mainly phytoplankton, were sampled from the two stations during May 2009 by filtering onto glass fibre filters (&#62; 0.7 μm to &#60; 200 μm) from surface waters and from below thermocline. The polar metabolite fraction was measured using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS), and the lipid fraction by direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS), these were then analysed to statistically compare their distributions. Results show significantly different profiles of metabolites across the four locations with the largest differences for both the polar and lipid fractions found between the two stations relative to the smaller differences associated with depth. We putatively annotate the most discriminant metabolites revealing a range of amino-acid derivatives, diacylglyceryltrimethylhomoserine (DGTS) lipids, oxidised fatty acids (oxylipins), glycosylated compounds, oligohexoses, phospholipids, triacylglycerides (TAGs) and oxidised TAGs. The majority of the polar metabolites were most abundant in the surface waters at L4 and least abundant in the deep waters at E1 (E1-70m). In contrast, the oxidised TAGS were most abundant at E1, particularly at E1-70m. Differentiated metabolites are discussed in relation to supporting data on nutrients, carbon and chlorophyll, and to metatranscriptome-derived phytoplankton taxonomy. Our results show for the first time the power of community metabolomics in discriminating metabolite patterns associated with marine POM.
published_date 2015-05-31T03:39:12Z
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