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The role of transport and mobility in the health of older people / Charles Musselwhite; Carol Holland; Ian Walker

Journal of Transport & Health, Volume: 2, Issue: 1, Pages: 1 - 4

Swansea University Author: Musselwhite, Charles

Abstract

The world׳s population is ageing. Older people are healthier and more active than previous generations. Living in a hypermobile world, people want to stay connected to dispersed communities as they age. Staying connected to communities and social networks enables older people to contribute and conne...

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Published in: Journal of Transport & Health
ISSN: 22141405
Published: 2015
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa20559
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first_indexed 2015-03-27T03:05:44Z
last_indexed 2019-06-05T09:49:03Z
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spelling 2019-06-04T16:51:23Z v2 20559 2015-03-26 The role of transport and mobility in the health of older people Charles Musselwhite Charles Musselwhite true 0000-0002-4831-2092 false c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c 75beebc8067424cc969d67472c4466a7 InStp5CuNrzTiXll2RhycFI/4mL4zIy/GXDlPjHD2Zg= 2015-03-26 HIA The world׳s population is ageing. Older people are healthier and more active than previous generations. Living in a hypermobile world, people want to stay connected to dispersed communities as they age. Staying connected to communities and social networks enables older people to contribute and connect with society and is associated with positive mental and physical health, facilitating independence and physical activity while reducing social isolation. Changes in physiology and cognition associated with later life mean longer journeys may have to be curtailed. A shift in focus is needed to fully explore older people, transport and health; a need to be multidisciplinary in approach and to embrace social sciences and arts and humanities. A need to embrace different types of mobilities is needed for a full understanding of ageing, transport and health, moving from literal or corporeal through virtual and potential to imaginative mobility, taking into account aspirations and emotions. Mobility in later life is more than a means of getting to destinations and includes more affective or emotive associations. Cycling and walking are facilitated not just by improving safety but through social and cultural norms. Car driving can be continued safely in later life if people make appropriate and informed decisions about when and how to stop driving; stringent testing of driver ability and skill has as yet had little effect on safety. Bus use facilitates physical activity and keeps people connected but there are concerns for the future viability of buses. The future of transport may be more community led and involve more sharing of transport modes. Journal article Journal of Transport & Health 2 1 1 4 22141405 Ageing, Health, Wellbeing, Transport, Mobilities, Older people 0 3 2015 2015-03-01 10.1016/j.jth.2015.02.001 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214140515000043 College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing CHHS HIA Swansea University Centre for Innovative Ageing None 2019-06-04T16:51:23Z 2015-03-26T14:54:21Z College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing Charles Musselwhite 1 Carol Holland 2 Ian Walker 3 0020559-07052015093022.pdf Musselwhite__et__al__(JTH)__editorial__The__role__of__transport__and__mobility__in__healthy__ageing__v2.pdf 2015-05-07T09:30:22Z Output 390797 application/pdf AO true Updated Copyright 04/06/2019 2015-05-07T00:00:00 true
title The role of transport and mobility in the health of older people
spellingShingle The role of transport and mobility in the health of older people
Musselwhite, Charles
title_short The role of transport and mobility in the health of older people
title_full The role of transport and mobility in the health of older people
title_fullStr The role of transport and mobility in the health of older people
title_full_unstemmed The role of transport and mobility in the health of older people
title_sort The role of transport and mobility in the health of older people
author_id_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c
author_id_fullname_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c_***_Musselwhite, Charles
author Musselwhite, Charles
author2 Charles Musselwhite
Carol Holland
Ian Walker
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Transport & Health
container_volume 2
container_issue 1
container_start_page 1
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
issn 22141405
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.jth.2015.02.001
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Centre for Innovative Ageing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Centre for Innovative Ageing
url http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214140515000043
document_store_str 1
active_str 1
researchgroup_str Centre for Innovative Ageing
description The world׳s population is ageing. Older people are healthier and more active than previous generations. Living in a hypermobile world, people want to stay connected to dispersed communities as they age. Staying connected to communities and social networks enables older people to contribute and connect with society and is associated with positive mental and physical health, facilitating independence and physical activity while reducing social isolation. Changes in physiology and cognition associated with later life mean longer journeys may have to be curtailed. A shift in focus is needed to fully explore older people, transport and health; a need to be multidisciplinary in approach and to embrace social sciences and arts and humanities. A need to embrace different types of mobilities is needed for a full understanding of ageing, transport and health, moving from literal or corporeal through virtual and potential to imaginative mobility, taking into account aspirations and emotions. Mobility in later life is more than a means of getting to destinations and includes more affective or emotive associations. Cycling and walking are facilitated not just by improving safety but through social and cultural norms. Car driving can be continued safely in later life if people make appropriate and informed decisions about when and how to stop driving; stringent testing of driver ability and skill has as yet had little effect on safety. Bus use facilitates physical activity and keeps people connected but there are concerns for the future viability of buses. The future of transport may be more community led and involve more sharing of transport modes.
published_date 2015-03-01T20:57:36Z
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