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Effects of Trophy Hunting Leftovers on the Ranging Behaviour of Large Carnivores: A Case Study on Spotted Hyenas

Gabriele Cozzi, Luca Borger Orcid Logo, Pascale Hutter, Daniela Abegg, Céline Beran, J. Weldon McNutt, Arpat Ozgul

PLOS ONE, Volume: 10, Issue: 3, Start page: e0121471

Swansea University Author: Luca Borger Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1371/journal.pone.0121471

Abstract

Human-related food resources such as garbage dumps and feeding sites have been shown to significantly influence space use, breeding success and population dynamics in a variety of animal species. In contrast, relatively little is known on the effects of unpredictable sources of food, such as carcass...

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Published in: PLOS ONE
Published: 2015
Online Access: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0121471
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa20626
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spelling 2021-07-16T14:51:36.3402626 v2 20626 2015-04-12 Effects of Trophy Hunting Leftovers on the Ranging Behaviour of Large Carnivores: A Case Study on Spotted Hyenas 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2 0000-0001-8763-5997 Luca Borger Luca Borger true false 2015-04-12 SBI Human-related food resources such as garbage dumps and feeding sites have been shown to significantly influence space use, breeding success and population dynamics in a variety of animal species. In contrast, relatively little is known on the effects of unpredictable sources of food, such as carcasses discarded by hunters, on carnivore species. We evaluated the effect of elephant carcasses, mainly deriving from trophy hunting, on the ranging and feeding behavior of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Using data from hyenas monitored before and during carcass availability via GPS radio-collars and camera traps, we investigated changes in ranging and feeding behavior over time. Carcass availability influenced hyenas’ ranging behavior for an average of 10–12 days, after which their movements returned to patterns observed before carcass availability. In particular, we observed an increased spatial clustering of locations and reduced speeds (up to 15% less) between successive locations with carcass availability. Consistent feeding at carcasses during the first two weeks was typical, and some individuals fed from elephant carcasses for as long as 50 days. The impact and conservation value of hunting are often assessed based solely on the effects on the hunted species. Our results show that hunting remains can influence other species and suggest that such extra food could have important effects on critical life history processes and ultimately population dynamics. We recommend conservationists and wildlife managers evaluate management strategies and hunting practices regarding carcass disposal in order to incorporate the potential collateral impacts of hunting on non-hunted species in the same community. Journal Article PLOS ONE 10 3 e0121471 Animal movement, movement ecology, trophy hunting, wildlife management, Conservation biology, wildlife management, applied ecology 20 3 2015 2015-03-20 10.1371/journal.pone.0121471 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0121471 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2021-07-16T14:51:36.3402626 2015-04-12T00:10:42.9049330 College of Science Biosciences Gabriele Cozzi 1 Luca Borger 0000-0001-8763-5997 2 Pascale Hutter 3 Daniela Abegg 4 Céline Beran 5 J. Weldon McNutt 6 Arpat Ozgul 7 0020626-08072015215902.pdf Cozzi_etal_2015_TrophyHuntingLeftoverEffects.pdf 2015-07-08T21:59:02.7700000 Output 515612 application/pdf Version of Record true 2015-07-08T00:00:00.0000000 Distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License (CC-BY-NC-ND) true
title Effects of Trophy Hunting Leftovers on the Ranging Behaviour of Large Carnivores: A Case Study on Spotted Hyenas
spellingShingle Effects of Trophy Hunting Leftovers on the Ranging Behaviour of Large Carnivores: A Case Study on Spotted Hyenas
Luca Borger
title_short Effects of Trophy Hunting Leftovers on the Ranging Behaviour of Large Carnivores: A Case Study on Spotted Hyenas
title_full Effects of Trophy Hunting Leftovers on the Ranging Behaviour of Large Carnivores: A Case Study on Spotted Hyenas
title_fullStr Effects of Trophy Hunting Leftovers on the Ranging Behaviour of Large Carnivores: A Case Study on Spotted Hyenas
title_full_unstemmed Effects of Trophy Hunting Leftovers on the Ranging Behaviour of Large Carnivores: A Case Study on Spotted Hyenas
title_sort Effects of Trophy Hunting Leftovers on the Ranging Behaviour of Large Carnivores: A Case Study on Spotted Hyenas
author_id_str_mv 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2_***_Luca Borger
author Luca Borger
author2 Gabriele Cozzi
Luca Borger
Pascale Hutter
Daniela Abegg
Céline Beran
J. Weldon McNutt
Arpat Ozgul
format Journal article
container_title PLOS ONE
container_volume 10
container_issue 3
container_start_page e0121471
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1371/journal.pone.0121471
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
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url http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0121471
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description Human-related food resources such as garbage dumps and feeding sites have been shown to significantly influence space use, breeding success and population dynamics in a variety of animal species. In contrast, relatively little is known on the effects of unpredictable sources of food, such as carcasses discarded by hunters, on carnivore species. We evaluated the effect of elephant carcasses, mainly deriving from trophy hunting, on the ranging and feeding behavior of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Using data from hyenas monitored before and during carcass availability via GPS radio-collars and camera traps, we investigated changes in ranging and feeding behavior over time. Carcass availability influenced hyenas’ ranging behavior for an average of 10–12 days, after which their movements returned to patterns observed before carcass availability. In particular, we observed an increased spatial clustering of locations and reduced speeds (up to 15% less) between successive locations with carcass availability. Consistent feeding at carcasses during the first two weeks was typical, and some individuals fed from elephant carcasses for as long as 50 days. The impact and conservation value of hunting are often assessed based solely on the effects on the hunted species. Our results show that hunting remains can influence other species and suggest that such extra food could have important effects on critical life history processes and ultimately population dynamics. We recommend conservationists and wildlife managers evaluate management strategies and hunting practices regarding carcass disposal in order to incorporate the potential collateral impacts of hunting on non-hunted species in the same community.
published_date 2015-03-20T03:39:57Z
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