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A new perspective on how humans assess their surroundings; derivation of head orientation and its role in ‘framing’ the environment / Ian, Davies; Mark, Jones; Adrian, Luckman; Mark, Holton; Rory, Wilson; David / Dave, Clarke

PeerJ, Volume: 3, Issue: e908, Pages: 1 - 29

Swansesa University Authors: Ian, Davies, Mark, Jones, Adrian, Luckman, Mark, Holton, Rory, Wilson, David / Dave, Clarke

DOI (Published version): 10.7717/peerj.908

Abstract

Understanding the way humans inform themselves about their environment is pivotal in helping explain our susceptibility to stimuli and how this modulates behaviour and movement patterns. We present a new device, the Human Interfaced Personal Observation Platform (HIPOP), which is a head-mounted (typ...

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Published in: PeerJ
Published: 2015
Online Access: https://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.908
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa20646
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We present a new device, the Human Interfaced Personal Observation Platform (HIPOP), which is a head-mounted (typically on a hat) unit that logs magnetometry and accelerometry data at high rates and, following appropriate calibration, can be used to determine the heading and pitch of the wearer's head. We used this device on participants visiting a botanical garden and noted that although head pitch ranged between -80&#xBA; and 60&#xBA;, 25% confidence limits were restricted to an arc of about 25&#xBA; with a tendency for the head to be pitched down (mean head pitch ranged between -43&#xBA; and 0&#xBA;). Mean rates of change of head pitch varied between -0.00187&#xBA;/0.1 s and 0.00187&#xBA;/0.1 s, markedly slower than rates of change of head heading which varied between -0.3141&#xBA;/0.1 s and 0.01263&#xBA;/0.1 s although frequency distributions of both parameters showed them to be symmetrical and monomodal. Overall, there was considerable variation in both head pitch and head heading, which highlighted the role that head orientation might play in exposing people to certain features of the environment. Thus, when used in tandem with accurate position-determining systems, the HIPOP can be used to determine how the head is orientated relative to gravity and geographic North and in relation to geographic position, presenting data on how the environment is being &#x2018;framed&#x2019; by people in relation to environmental content.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>PeerJ</journal><volume>3</volume><journalNumber>e908</journalNumber><paginationStart>1</paginationStart><paginationEnd>29</paginationEnd><publisher/><keywords/><publishedDay>18</publishedDay><publishedMonth>6</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2015</publishedYear><publishedDate>2015-06-18</publishedDate><doi>10.7717/peerj.908</doi><url>https://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.908</url><notes></notes><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Mathematics</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>SMA</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><lastEdited>2017-05-22T16:13:15.9083218</lastEdited><Created>2015-04-14T09:44:55.2560071</Created><path><level id="1">College of Science</level><level id="2">Computer Science</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Gwendoline I.</firstname><surname>Wilson</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Mark</firstname><surname>Holton</surname><orcid>0000-0001-8834-3283</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>James</firstname><surname>Walker</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Mark</firstname><surname>Jones</surname><orcid>0000-0001-8991-1190</orcid><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Ed</firstname><surname>Grundy</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Ian</firstname><surname>Davies</surname><orcid>0000-0002-4872-5786</orcid><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>David B.</firstname><surname>Clarke</surname><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Adrian</firstname><surname>Luckman</surname><orcid>0000-0002-9618-5905</orcid><order>8</order></author><author><firstname>Nick</firstname><surname>Russill</surname><order>9</order></author><author><firstname>Vianney L.</firstname><surname>Wilson</surname><order>10</order></author><author><firstname>Rosie</firstname><surname>Plummer</surname><order>11</order></author><author><firstname>Rory</firstname><surname>Wilson</surname><orcid>0000-0003-3177-0177</orcid><order>12</order></author><author><firstname>David / Dave</firstname><surname>Clarke</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0319-2661</orcid><order>13</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0020646-12042017170904.pdf</filename><originalFilename>peerj-908.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2017-04-12T17:09:04.5300000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>15993331</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><embargoDate>2015-06-18T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents></rfc1807>
spelling 2017-05-22T16:13:15.9083218 v2 20646 2015-04-14 A new perspective on how humans assess their surroundings; derivation of head orientation and its role in ‘framing’ the environment 3eddb437f814b8134d644309f8b5693c 0000-0002-4872-5786 Ian Davies Ian Davies true false 2e1030b6e14fc9debd5d5ae7cc335562 0000-0001-8991-1190 Mark Jones Mark Jones true false 008cb668b2671b653a88677f075799a9 0000-0002-9618-5905 Adrian Luckman Adrian Luckman true false 0e1d89d0cc934a740dcd0a873aed178e 0000-0001-8834-3283 Mark Holton Mark Holton true false 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc 0000-0003-3177-0177 Rory Wilson Rory Wilson true false 06b3176d7dae8726451bf88ef7824b4f 0000-0003-0319-2661 David / Dave Clarke David / Dave Clarke true false 2015-04-14 SMA Understanding the way humans inform themselves about their environment is pivotal in helping explain our susceptibility to stimuli and how this modulates behaviour and movement patterns. We present a new device, the Human Interfaced Personal Observation Platform (HIPOP), which is a head-mounted (typically on a hat) unit that logs magnetometry and accelerometry data at high rates and, following appropriate calibration, can be used to determine the heading and pitch of the wearer's head. We used this device on participants visiting a botanical garden and noted that although head pitch ranged between -80º and 60º, 25% confidence limits were restricted to an arc of about 25º with a tendency for the head to be pitched down (mean head pitch ranged between -43º and 0º). Mean rates of change of head pitch varied between -0.00187º/0.1 s and 0.00187º/0.1 s, markedly slower than rates of change of head heading which varied between -0.3141º/0.1 s and 0.01263º/0.1 s although frequency distributions of both parameters showed them to be symmetrical and monomodal. Overall, there was considerable variation in both head pitch and head heading, which highlighted the role that head orientation might play in exposing people to certain features of the environment. Thus, when used in tandem with accurate position-determining systems, the HIPOP can be used to determine how the head is orientated relative to gravity and geographic North and in relation to geographic position, presenting data on how the environment is being ‘framed’ by people in relation to environmental content. Journal Article PeerJ 3 e908 1 29 18 6 2015 2015-06-18 10.7717/peerj.908 https://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.908 COLLEGE NANME Mathematics COLLEGE CODE SMA Swansea University 2017-05-22T16:13:15.9083218 2015-04-14T09:44:55.2560071 College of Science Computer Science Gwendoline I. Wilson 1 Mark Holton 0000-0001-8834-3283 2 James Walker 3 Mark Jones 0000-0001-8991-1190 4 Ed Grundy 5 Ian Davies 0000-0002-4872-5786 6 David B. Clarke 7 Adrian Luckman 0000-0002-9618-5905 8 Nick Russill 9 Vianney L. Wilson 10 Rosie Plummer 11 Rory Wilson 0000-0003-3177-0177 12 David / Dave Clarke 0000-0003-0319-2661 13 0020646-12042017170904.pdf peerj-908.pdf 2017-04-12T17:09:04.5300000 Output 15993331 application/pdf Version of Record true 2015-06-18T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title A new perspective on how humans assess their surroundings; derivation of head orientation and its role in ‘framing’ the environment
spellingShingle A new perspective on how humans assess their surroundings; derivation of head orientation and its role in ‘framing’ the environment
Ian, Davies
Mark, Jones
Adrian, Luckman
Mark, Holton
Rory, Wilson
David / Dave, Clarke
title_short A new perspective on how humans assess their surroundings; derivation of head orientation and its role in ‘framing’ the environment
title_full A new perspective on how humans assess their surroundings; derivation of head orientation and its role in ‘framing’ the environment
title_fullStr A new perspective on how humans assess their surroundings; derivation of head orientation and its role in ‘framing’ the environment
title_full_unstemmed A new perspective on how humans assess their surroundings; derivation of head orientation and its role in ‘framing’ the environment
title_sort A new perspective on how humans assess their surroundings; derivation of head orientation and its role in ‘framing’ the environment
author_id_str_mv 3eddb437f814b8134d644309f8b5693c
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author_id_fullname_str_mv 3eddb437f814b8134d644309f8b5693c_***_Ian, Davies
2e1030b6e14fc9debd5d5ae7cc335562_***_Mark, Jones
008cb668b2671b653a88677f075799a9_***_Adrian, Luckman
0e1d89d0cc934a740dcd0a873aed178e_***_Mark, Holton
017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc_***_Rory, Wilson
06b3176d7dae8726451bf88ef7824b4f_***_David / Dave, Clarke
author Ian, Davies
Mark, Jones
Adrian, Luckman
Mark, Holton
Rory, Wilson
David / Dave, Clarke
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publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
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url https://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.908
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description Understanding the way humans inform themselves about their environment is pivotal in helping explain our susceptibility to stimuli and how this modulates behaviour and movement patterns. We present a new device, the Human Interfaced Personal Observation Platform (HIPOP), which is a head-mounted (typically on a hat) unit that logs magnetometry and accelerometry data at high rates and, following appropriate calibration, can be used to determine the heading and pitch of the wearer's head. We used this device on participants visiting a botanical garden and noted that although head pitch ranged between -80º and 60º, 25% confidence limits were restricted to an arc of about 25º with a tendency for the head to be pitched down (mean head pitch ranged between -43º and 0º). Mean rates of change of head pitch varied between -0.00187º/0.1 s and 0.00187º/0.1 s, markedly slower than rates of change of head heading which varied between -0.3141º/0.1 s and 0.01263º/0.1 s although frequency distributions of both parameters showed them to be symmetrical and monomodal. Overall, there was considerable variation in both head pitch and head heading, which highlighted the role that head orientation might play in exposing people to certain features of the environment. Thus, when used in tandem with accurate position-determining systems, the HIPOP can be used to determine how the head is orientated relative to gravity and geographic North and in relation to geographic position, presenting data on how the environment is being ‘framed’ by people in relation to environmental content.
published_date 2015-06-18T12:34:36Z
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