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Observation Interventions as a Means to Manipulate Collective Efficacy in Groups / Adam M. Bruton; Stephen Mellalieu; David A. Shearer

Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, Volume: 36, Issue: 1, Pages: 27 - 39

Swansea University Author: Stephen, Mellalieu

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DOI (Published version): 10.1123/jsep.2013-0058

Abstract

The purpose of this multistudy investigation was to examine observation as an intervention for the manipulation of individual collective efficacy beliefs. Study 1 compared the effects of positive, neutral, and negative video footage of practice trials from an obstacle course task on collective effic...

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Published in: Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Published: 2014
Online Access: http://journals.humankinetics.com/jsep-back-issues/jsep-volume-36-issue-1-february/observation-interventions-as-a-means-to-manipulate-collective-efficacy-in-groups
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21111
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first_indexed 2015-05-07T02:10:09Z
last_indexed 2018-09-17T12:17:19Z
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spelling 2018-09-17T10:32:10.8854477 v2 21111 2015-05-06 Observation Interventions as a Means to Manipulate Collective Efficacy in Groups 9e06d88e33af61c50629d1c3da4a0e36 Stephen Mellalieu Stephen Mellalieu true false 2015-05-06 STSC The purpose of this multistudy investigation was to examine observation as an intervention for the manipulation of individual collective efficacy beliefs. Study 1 compared the effects of positive, neutral, and negative video footage of practice trials from an obstacle course task on collective efficacy beliefs in assigned groups. The content of the observation intervention (i.e., positive, neutral, and negative video footage) significantly influenced the direction of change in collective efficacy (p < .05). Study 2 assessed the influence of content familiarity (own team/sport vs. unfamiliar team/sport) on individual collective efficacy perceptions when observing positive footage of competitive basketball performance. Collective efficacy significantly increased for both the familiar and unfamiliar conditions postintervention, with the largest increase for the familiar condition (p < .05). The studies support the use of observation as an intervention to enhance individual perceptions of collective efficacy in group-based activities. The findings suggest that observations of any group displaying positive group characteristics are likely to increase collective efficacy beliefs; however, observation of one’s own team leads to the greatest increases. Journal Article Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology 36 1 27 39 collective efficacy, observation, manipulation, content, familiarity 31 12 2014 2014-12-31 10.1123/jsep.2013-0058 http://journals.humankinetics.com/jsep-back-issues/jsep-volume-36-issue-1-february/observation-interventions-as-a-means-to-manipulate-collective-efficacy-in-groups COLLEGE NANME Sports Science COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2018-09-17T10:32:10.8854477 2015-05-06T14:24:28.9498792 Adam M. Bruton 1 Stephen Mellalieu 2 David A. Shearer 3
title Observation Interventions as a Means to Manipulate Collective Efficacy in Groups
spellingShingle Observation Interventions as a Means to Manipulate Collective Efficacy in Groups
Stephen, Mellalieu
title_short Observation Interventions as a Means to Manipulate Collective Efficacy in Groups
title_full Observation Interventions as a Means to Manipulate Collective Efficacy in Groups
title_fullStr Observation Interventions as a Means to Manipulate Collective Efficacy in Groups
title_full_unstemmed Observation Interventions as a Means to Manipulate Collective Efficacy in Groups
title_sort Observation Interventions as a Means to Manipulate Collective Efficacy in Groups
author_id_str_mv 9e06d88e33af61c50629d1c3da4a0e36
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9e06d88e33af61c50629d1c3da4a0e36_***_Stephen, Mellalieu
author Stephen, Mellalieu
author2 Adam M. Bruton
Stephen Mellalieu
David A. Shearer
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
container_volume 36
container_issue 1
container_start_page 27
publishDate 2014
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1123/jsep.2013-0058
url http://journals.humankinetics.com/jsep-back-issues/jsep-volume-36-issue-1-february/observation-interventions-as-a-means-to-manipulate-collective-efficacy-in-groups
document_store_str 0
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description The purpose of this multistudy investigation was to examine observation as an intervention for the manipulation of individual collective efficacy beliefs. Study 1 compared the effects of positive, neutral, and negative video footage of practice trials from an obstacle course task on collective efficacy beliefs in assigned groups. The content of the observation intervention (i.e., positive, neutral, and negative video footage) significantly influenced the direction of change in collective efficacy (p < .05). Study 2 assessed the influence of content familiarity (own team/sport vs. unfamiliar team/sport) on individual collective efficacy perceptions when observing positive footage of competitive basketball performance. Collective efficacy significantly increased for both the familiar and unfamiliar conditions postintervention, with the largest increase for the familiar condition (p < .05). The studies support the use of observation as an intervention to enhance individual perceptions of collective efficacy in group-based activities. The findings suggest that observations of any group displaying positive group characteristics are likely to increase collective efficacy beliefs; however, observation of one’s own team leads to the greatest increases.
published_date 2014-12-31T03:35:08Z
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