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Further examinations of mobility in later life and improving health and wellbeing / Charles Musselwhite

Journal of Transport & Health, Volume: 2, Issue: 2, Pages: 99 - 100

Swansea University Author: Charles Musselwhite

DOI (Published version): 10.1016/j.jth.2015.04.002

Abstract

Research is needed to examine how to improve mobility in later life. Research in this section of the special issue suggests that pet ownership, proximity to amenities and culture are associated with older people walking more. Two popular emerging technologies are examined including, mobility scooter...

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Published in: Journal of Transport & Health
Published: 2015
Online Access: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214140515000250
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21195
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first_indexed 2015-05-08T02:10:40Z
last_indexed 2019-06-05T09:50:55Z
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spelling 2019-06-04T16:39:08.4392690 v2 21195 2015-05-07 Further examinations of mobility in later life and improving health and wellbeing c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c 0000-0002-4831-2092 Charles Musselwhite Charles Musselwhite true false 2015-05-07 PHAC Research is needed to examine how to improve mobility in later life. Research in this section of the special issue suggests that pet ownership, proximity to amenities and culture are associated with older people walking more. Two popular emerging technologies are examined including, mobility scooters and e-bikes and the potential for them to enable mobility, along with barriers to use are included. With regards to driving, there is further evidence that self-regulation planning and implementation intentions may help older drivers achieve their mobility goals and promote safer driving across the lifecourse. In addition, to help older people stay on the roads, support from medical experts is welcomed, though evidence here suggests medical professionals are not always confident to supply it.In conclusion, there is a need to look at the wider relationship between mobility, ageing and health embracing a transdisciplinary and intergenerational approach. Journal Article Journal of Transport & Health 2 2 99 100 Ageing, Gerontology, Lifecourse, Walking, Cycling, Driving 30 6 2015 2015-06-30 10.1016/j.jth.2015.04.002 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214140515000250 COLLEGE NANME Public Health COLLEGE CODE PHAC Swansea University 2019-06-04T16:39:08.4392690 2015-05-07T09:58:21.2497392 College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing Charles Musselwhite 0000-0002-4831-2092 1 0021195-07052015100158.pdf Musselwhite__editorial__2__JTH__JM_More__on__mobility__in__later__life__pre__print.pdf 2015-05-07T10:01:58.0800000 Output 299668 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2015-05-07T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Further examinations of mobility in later life and improving health and wellbeing
spellingShingle Further examinations of mobility in later life and improving health and wellbeing
Charles, Musselwhite
title_short Further examinations of mobility in later life and improving health and wellbeing
title_full Further examinations of mobility in later life and improving health and wellbeing
title_fullStr Further examinations of mobility in later life and improving health and wellbeing
title_full_unstemmed Further examinations of mobility in later life and improving health and wellbeing
title_sort Further examinations of mobility in later life and improving health and wellbeing
author_id_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c
author_id_fullname_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c_***_Charles, Musselwhite
author Charles, Musselwhite
author2 Charles Musselwhite
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Transport & Health
container_volume 2
container_issue 2
container_start_page 99
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.jth.2015.04.002
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Centre for Innovative Ageing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Centre for Innovative Ageing
url http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214140515000250
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description Research is needed to examine how to improve mobility in later life. Research in this section of the special issue suggests that pet ownership, proximity to amenities and culture are associated with older people walking more. Two popular emerging technologies are examined including, mobility scooters and e-bikes and the potential for them to enable mobility, along with barriers to use are included. With regards to driving, there is further evidence that self-regulation planning and implementation intentions may help older drivers achieve their mobility goals and promote safer driving across the lifecourse. In addition, to help older people stay on the roads, support from medical experts is welcomed, though evidence here suggests medical professionals are not always confident to supply it.In conclusion, there is a need to look at the wider relationship between mobility, ageing and health embracing a transdisciplinary and intergenerational approach.
published_date 2015-06-30T03:35:22Z
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