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Use of Long-Distance Migration Patterns of an Endangered Species to Inform Conservation Planning for the World's Largest Marine Protected Area / GRAEME C. HAYS, JEANNE A. MORTIMER, DANIEL IERODIACONOU, Nicole Esteban

Conservation Biology, Volume: 28, Issue: 6, Pages: 1636 - 1644

Swansea University Author: Nicole Esteban

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/cobi.12325

Abstract

Large marine protected areas (MPAs), each hundreds of thousands of square kilometers, have been set up by governments around the world over the last decade as part of efforts to reduce ocean biodiversity declines, yet their efficacy is hotly debated. The Chagos Archipelago MPA (640,000 km2) (Indian...

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Published in: Conservation Biology
ISSN: 0888-8892
Published: Wiley 2014
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21275
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spelling 2020-11-12T11:57:14.3034186 v2 21275 2015-05-09 Use of Long-Distance Migration Patterns of an Endangered Species to Inform Conservation Planning for the World's Largest Marine Protected Area fb2e760b83b4580e7445092982f1f319 0000-0003-4693-7221 Nicole Esteban Nicole Esteban true false 2015-05-09 SBI Large marine protected areas (MPAs), each hundreds of thousands of square kilometers, have been set up by governments around the world over the last decade as part of efforts to reduce ocean biodiversity declines, yet their efficacy is hotly debated. The Chagos Archipelago MPA (640,000 km2) (Indian Ocean) lies at the heart of this debate. We conducted the first satellite tracking of a migratory species, the green turtle (Chelonia mydas), within the MPA and assessed the species’ use of protected versus unprotected areas. We developed an approach to estimate length of residence within the MPA that may have utility across migratory taxa including tuna and sharks. We recorded the longest ever published migration for an adult cheloniid turtle (3979 km). Seven of 8 tracked individuals migrated to distant foraging grounds, often 1000 km outside the MPA. One turtle traveled to foraging grounds within the MPA. Thus, networks of small MPAs, developed synergistically with larger MPAs, may increase the amount of time migrating species spend within protected areas. The MPA will protect turtles during the breeding season and will protect some turtles on their foraging grounds within the MPA and others during the first part of their long-distance postbreeding oceanic migrations. International cooperation will be needed to develop the network of small MPAs needed to supplement the Chagos Archipelago MPA. Journal Article Conservation Biology 28 6 1636 1644 Wiley 0888-8892 Chagos, Argos, Chelonia, GPS tracking, MPA, reserve 1 12 2014 2014-12-01 10.1111/cobi.12325 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2020-11-12T11:57:14.3034186 2015-05-09T22:19:48.8764986 College of Science Biosciences GRAEME C. HAYS 1 JEANNE A. MORTIMER 2 DANIEL IERODIACONOU 3 Nicole Esteban 0000-0003-4693-7221 4 0021275-02052019153117.pdf Hays_Chagos-satellitetracking-Cons_Biol_2014-accepted-version.pdf 2019-05-02T15:31:17.3100000 Output 649765 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2015-07-15T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Use of Long-Distance Migration Patterns of an Endangered Species to Inform Conservation Planning for the World's Largest Marine Protected Area
spellingShingle Use of Long-Distance Migration Patterns of an Endangered Species to Inform Conservation Planning for the World's Largest Marine Protected Area
Nicole, Esteban
title_short Use of Long-Distance Migration Patterns of an Endangered Species to Inform Conservation Planning for the World's Largest Marine Protected Area
title_full Use of Long-Distance Migration Patterns of an Endangered Species to Inform Conservation Planning for the World's Largest Marine Protected Area
title_fullStr Use of Long-Distance Migration Patterns of an Endangered Species to Inform Conservation Planning for the World's Largest Marine Protected Area
title_full_unstemmed Use of Long-Distance Migration Patterns of an Endangered Species to Inform Conservation Planning for the World's Largest Marine Protected Area
title_sort Use of Long-Distance Migration Patterns of an Endangered Species to Inform Conservation Planning for the World's Largest Marine Protected Area
author_id_str_mv fb2e760b83b4580e7445092982f1f319
author_id_fullname_str_mv fb2e760b83b4580e7445092982f1f319_***_Nicole, Esteban
author Nicole, Esteban
author2 GRAEME C. HAYS
JEANNE A. MORTIMER
DANIEL IERODIACONOU
Nicole Esteban
format Journal article
container_title Conservation Biology
container_volume 28
container_issue 6
container_start_page 1636
publishDate 2014
institution Swansea University
issn 0888-8892
doi_str_mv 10.1111/cobi.12325
publisher Wiley
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
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description Large marine protected areas (MPAs), each hundreds of thousands of square kilometers, have been set up by governments around the world over the last decade as part of efforts to reduce ocean biodiversity declines, yet their efficacy is hotly debated. The Chagos Archipelago MPA (640,000 km2) (Indian Ocean) lies at the heart of this debate. We conducted the first satellite tracking of a migratory species, the green turtle (Chelonia mydas), within the MPA and assessed the species’ use of protected versus unprotected areas. We developed an approach to estimate length of residence within the MPA that may have utility across migratory taxa including tuna and sharks. We recorded the longest ever published migration for an adult cheloniid turtle (3979 km). Seven of 8 tracked individuals migrated to distant foraging grounds, often 1000 km outside the MPA. One turtle traveled to foraging grounds within the MPA. Thus, networks of small MPAs, developed synergistically with larger MPAs, may increase the amount of time migrating species spend within protected areas. The MPA will protect turtles during the breeding season and will protect some turtles on their foraging grounds within the MPA and others during the first part of their long-distance postbreeding oceanic migrations. International cooperation will be needed to develop the network of small MPAs needed to supplement the Chagos Archipelago MPA.
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