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Measuring Recovery in Elite Rugby Players: The Brief Assessment of Mood, Endocrine Changes, and Power / David A. Shearer, Liam Kilduff, Charlotte Finn, Rhys M. Jones, Richard Bracken, Stephen D. Mellalieu, Nic Owen, Blair T. Crewther, Christian J. Cook, Nicholas Owen

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, Volume: 86, Issue: 4, Pages: 379 - 386

Swansea University Authors: Liam Kilduff, Richard Bracken, Nicholas Owen

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Abstract

Purpose: There is demand in applied sport settings to measure recovery briefly and accurately. Research indicates mood disturbance as the strongest psychological predictor of mental and physical recovery. The Brief Assessment of Mood (BAM) is a shortened version of the Profile of Mood States that ca...

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Published in: Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
ISSN: 0270-1367 2168-3824
Published: 2015
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa22953
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2019-05-10T14:49:24.8303159</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>22953</id><entry>2015-08-20</entry><title>Measuring Recovery in Elite Rugby Players: The Brief Assessment of Mood, Endocrine Changes, and Power</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-9449-2293</ORCID><firstname>Liam</firstname><surname>Kilduff</surname><name>Liam Kilduff</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>f5da81cd18adfdedb2ccb845bddc12f7</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-6986-6449</ORCID><firstname>Richard</firstname><surname>Bracken</surname><name>Richard Bracken</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>360b7822fd760c7d73a1b0ca5bce1c07</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-7067-8082</ORCID><firstname>Nicholas</firstname><surname>Owen</surname><name>Nicholas Owen</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2015-08-20</date><deptcode>STSC</deptcode><abstract>Purpose: There is demand in applied sport settings to measure recovery briefly and accurately. Research indicates mood disturbance as the strongest psychological predictor of mental and physical recovery. The Brief Assessment of Mood (BAM) is a shortened version of the Profile of Mood States that can be completed in less than 30&#xA0;s. The purpose of this study was to examine the BAM as a quick measure of mood in relation to recovery status in elite rugby players alongside established physiological markers of recovery. Method: Using elite rugby union players (N&#xA0;=&#xA0;12), this study examined the utility of BAM as an indicator of mental and physical recovery in elite athletes by exploring pattern change in mood disturbance, energy index, power output, cortisol, and testosterone 36&#xA0;hr before and 12&#xA0;hr, 36&#xA0;hr, and 60&#xA0;hr after a competitive rugby match. Results: Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance indicated significant changes in all variables across the 4 time points (p&#xA0;&amp;#60;&#xA0;.05, &#x3B7;2 range&#xA0;=&#xA0;.20&#x2013;.48), concurrent with previous study findings. Although visual inspection of the graphs indicated that the pattern of change for mood disturbance and energy index mapped changes in all physiological variables, only a low correlation was observed for power output (r&#xA0;=&#xA0;&#x2212;&#xA0;.34). Conclusions: Although BAM scores changed significantly over time in accordance with the hypotheses, further testing is required to confirm the utility of the BAM as a measure of recovery. The results indicate that the BAM could be used as 1 indicator of recovery status alongside other measures.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport</journal><volume>86</volume><journalNumber>4</journalNumber><paginationStart>379</paginationStart><paginationEnd>386</paginationEnd><publisher/><issnPrint>0270-1367</issnPrint><issnElectronic>2168-3824</issnElectronic><keywords>elite, hormones, neuromuscular, perception, rugby union, power</keywords><publishedDay>19</publishedDay><publishedMonth>8</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2015</publishedYear><publishedDate>2015-08-19</publishedDate><doi>10.1080/02701367.2015.1066927</doi><url>http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02701367.2015.1066927#.VdV-FHgk_dk</url><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2019-05-10T14:49:24.8303159</lastEdited><Created>2015-08-20T08:46:36.2996578</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Engineering</level></path><authors><author><firstname>David A.</firstname><surname>Shearer</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Liam</firstname><surname>Kilduff</surname><orcid>0000-0001-9449-2293</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Charlotte</firstname><surname>Finn</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Rhys M.</firstname><surname>Jones</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Richard</firstname><surname>Bracken</surname><orcid>0000-0002-6986-6449</orcid><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Stephen D.</firstname><surname>Mellalieu</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Nic</firstname><surname>Owen</surname><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Blair T.</firstname><surname>Crewther</surname><order>8</order></author><author><firstname>Christian J.</firstname><surname>Cook</surname><order>9</order></author><author><firstname>Nicholas</firstname><surname>Owen</surname><orcid>0000-0002-7067-8082</orcid><order>10</order></author></authors><documents/><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2019-05-10T14:49:24.8303159 v2 22953 2015-08-20 Measuring Recovery in Elite Rugby Players: The Brief Assessment of Mood, Endocrine Changes, and Power 972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98 0000-0001-9449-2293 Liam Kilduff Liam Kilduff true false f5da81cd18adfdedb2ccb845bddc12f7 0000-0002-6986-6449 Richard Bracken Richard Bracken true false 360b7822fd760c7d73a1b0ca5bce1c07 0000-0002-7067-8082 Nicholas Owen Nicholas Owen true false 2015-08-20 STSC Purpose: There is demand in applied sport settings to measure recovery briefly and accurately. Research indicates mood disturbance as the strongest psychological predictor of mental and physical recovery. The Brief Assessment of Mood (BAM) is a shortened version of the Profile of Mood States that can be completed in less than 30 s. The purpose of this study was to examine the BAM as a quick measure of mood in relation to recovery status in elite rugby players alongside established physiological markers of recovery. Method: Using elite rugby union players (N = 12), this study examined the utility of BAM as an indicator of mental and physical recovery in elite athletes by exploring pattern change in mood disturbance, energy index, power output, cortisol, and testosterone 36 hr before and 12 hr, 36 hr, and 60 hr after a competitive rugby match. Results: Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance indicated significant changes in all variables across the 4 time points (p &#60; .05, η2 range = .20–.48), concurrent with previous study findings. Although visual inspection of the graphs indicated that the pattern of change for mood disturbance and energy index mapped changes in all physiological variables, only a low correlation was observed for power output (r = − .34). Conclusions: Although BAM scores changed significantly over time in accordance with the hypotheses, further testing is required to confirm the utility of the BAM as a measure of recovery. The results indicate that the BAM could be used as 1 indicator of recovery status alongside other measures. Journal Article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport 86 4 379 386 0270-1367 2168-3824 elite, hormones, neuromuscular, perception, rugby union, power 19 8 2015 2015-08-19 10.1080/02701367.2015.1066927 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02701367.2015.1066927#.VdV-FHgk_dk COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2019-05-10T14:49:24.8303159 2015-08-20T08:46:36.2996578 College of Engineering Engineering David A. Shearer 1 Liam Kilduff 0000-0001-9449-2293 2 Charlotte Finn 3 Rhys M. Jones 4 Richard Bracken 0000-0002-6986-6449 5 Stephen D. Mellalieu 6 Nic Owen 7 Blair T. Crewther 8 Christian J. Cook 9 Nicholas Owen 0000-0002-7067-8082 10
title Measuring Recovery in Elite Rugby Players: The Brief Assessment of Mood, Endocrine Changes, and Power
spellingShingle Measuring Recovery in Elite Rugby Players: The Brief Assessment of Mood, Endocrine Changes, and Power
Liam, Kilduff
Richard, Bracken
Nicholas, Owen
title_short Measuring Recovery in Elite Rugby Players: The Brief Assessment of Mood, Endocrine Changes, and Power
title_full Measuring Recovery in Elite Rugby Players: The Brief Assessment of Mood, Endocrine Changes, and Power
title_fullStr Measuring Recovery in Elite Rugby Players: The Brief Assessment of Mood, Endocrine Changes, and Power
title_full_unstemmed Measuring Recovery in Elite Rugby Players: The Brief Assessment of Mood, Endocrine Changes, and Power
title_sort Measuring Recovery in Elite Rugby Players: The Brief Assessment of Mood, Endocrine Changes, and Power
author_id_str_mv 972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98
f5da81cd18adfdedb2ccb845bddc12f7
360b7822fd760c7d73a1b0ca5bce1c07
author_id_fullname_str_mv 972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98_***_Liam, Kilduff
f5da81cd18adfdedb2ccb845bddc12f7_***_Richard, Bracken
360b7822fd760c7d73a1b0ca5bce1c07_***_Nicholas, Owen
author Liam, Kilduff
Richard, Bracken
Nicholas, Owen
author2 David A. Shearer
Liam Kilduff
Charlotte Finn
Rhys M. Jones
Richard Bracken
Stephen D. Mellalieu
Nic Owen
Blair T. Crewther
Christian J. Cook
Nicholas Owen
format Journal article
container_title Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
container_volume 86
container_issue 4
container_start_page 379
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
issn 0270-1367
2168-3824
doi_str_mv 10.1080/02701367.2015.1066927
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
url http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02701367.2015.1066927#.VdV-FHgk_dk
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description Purpose: There is demand in applied sport settings to measure recovery briefly and accurately. Research indicates mood disturbance as the strongest psychological predictor of mental and physical recovery. The Brief Assessment of Mood (BAM) is a shortened version of the Profile of Mood States that can be completed in less than 30 s. The purpose of this study was to examine the BAM as a quick measure of mood in relation to recovery status in elite rugby players alongside established physiological markers of recovery. Method: Using elite rugby union players (N = 12), this study examined the utility of BAM as an indicator of mental and physical recovery in elite athletes by exploring pattern change in mood disturbance, energy index, power output, cortisol, and testosterone 36 hr before and 12 hr, 36 hr, and 60 hr after a competitive rugby match. Results: Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance indicated significant changes in all variables across the 4 time points (p &#60; .05, η2 range = .20–.48), concurrent with previous study findings. Although visual inspection of the graphs indicated that the pattern of change for mood disturbance and energy index mapped changes in all physiological variables, only a low correlation was observed for power output (r = − .34). Conclusions: Although BAM scores changed significantly over time in accordance with the hypotheses, further testing is required to confirm the utility of the BAM as a measure of recovery. The results indicate that the BAM could be used as 1 indicator of recovery status alongside other measures.
published_date 2015-08-19T03:33:55Z
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