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Gas migration regimes and outgassing in particle-rich suspensions

Julie Oppenheimer, Alison C. Rust, Katharine V. Cashman, Bjornar Sandnes Orcid Logo

Frontiers in Physics, Volume: 3

Swansea University Author: Bjornar Sandnes Orcid Logo

DOI (Published version): 10.3389/fphy.2015.00060

Abstract

Understanding how gasses escape from particle-rich suspensions has important applications in nature and industry. Motivated by applications such as outgassing of crystal-rich magmas, we map gas migration patterns in experiments where we vary (1) particle fractions and liquid viscosity (10–500 Pa s),...

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Published in: Frontiers in Physics
Published: 2015
Online Access: http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fphy.2015.00060/abstract
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa22959
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spelling 2019-05-30T14:51:55.4182060 v2 22959 2015-08-21 Gas migration regimes and outgassing in particle-rich suspensions 61c7c04b5c804d9402caf4881e85234b 0000-0002-4854-5857 Bjornar Sandnes Bjornar Sandnes true false 2015-08-21 CHEG Understanding how gasses escape from particle-rich suspensions has important applications in nature and industry. Motivated by applications such as outgassing of crystal-rich magmas, we map gas migration patterns in experiments where we vary (1) particle fractions and liquid viscosity (10–500 Pa s), (2) container shape (horizontal parallel plates and upright cylinders), and (3) methods of bubble generation (single bubble injections, and multiple bubble generation with chemical reactions). We identify two successive changes in gas migration behavior that are determined by the normalized particle fraction (relative to random close packing), and are insensitive to liquid viscosity, bubble growth rate or container shape within the explored ranges. The first occurs at the random loose packing, when gas bubbles begin to deform; the second occurs near the random close packing, and is characterized by gas migration in a fracture-like manner. We suggest that changes in gas migration behavior are caused by dilation of the granular network, which locally resists bubble growth. The resulting bubble deformation increases the likelihood of bubble coalescence, and promotes the development of permeable pathways at low porosities. This behavior may explain the efficient loss of volatiles from viscous slurries such as crystal-rich magmas. Journal Article Frontiers in Physics 3 three-phase suspension, porosity, permeability, outgassing, bubble deformation, granular material, rheology, crystal-rich magma 12 8 2015 2015-08-12 10.3389/fphy.2015.00060 http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fphy.2015.00060/abstract COLLEGE NANME Chemical Engineering COLLEGE CODE CHEG Swansea University 2019-05-30T14:51:55.4182060 2015-08-21T14:14:28.1856648 College of Engineering Engineering Julie Oppenheimer 1 Alison C. Rust 2 Katharine V. Cashman 3 Bjornar Sandnes 0000-0002-4854-5857 4 0022959-21082015141731.pdf Oppenheimer-fphy-03-00060-2015.pdf 2015-08-21T14:17:31.8270000 Output 4615384 application/pdf Version of Record true 2015-08-21T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Gas migration regimes and outgassing in particle-rich suspensions
spellingShingle Gas migration regimes and outgassing in particle-rich suspensions
Bjornar Sandnes
title_short Gas migration regimes and outgassing in particle-rich suspensions
title_full Gas migration regimes and outgassing in particle-rich suspensions
title_fullStr Gas migration regimes and outgassing in particle-rich suspensions
title_full_unstemmed Gas migration regimes and outgassing in particle-rich suspensions
title_sort Gas migration regimes and outgassing in particle-rich suspensions
author_id_str_mv 61c7c04b5c804d9402caf4881e85234b
author_id_fullname_str_mv 61c7c04b5c804d9402caf4881e85234b_***_Bjornar Sandnes
author Bjornar Sandnes
author2 Julie Oppenheimer
Alison C. Rust
Katharine V. Cashman
Bjornar Sandnes
format Journal article
container_title Frontiers in Physics
container_volume 3
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.3389/fphy.2015.00060
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
url http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fphy.2015.00060/abstract
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Understanding how gasses escape from particle-rich suspensions has important applications in nature and industry. Motivated by applications such as outgassing of crystal-rich magmas, we map gas migration patterns in experiments where we vary (1) particle fractions and liquid viscosity (10–500 Pa s), (2) container shape (horizontal parallel plates and upright cylinders), and (3) methods of bubble generation (single bubble injections, and multiple bubble generation with chemical reactions). We identify two successive changes in gas migration behavior that are determined by the normalized particle fraction (relative to random close packing), and are insensitive to liquid viscosity, bubble growth rate or container shape within the explored ranges. The first occurs at the random loose packing, when gas bubbles begin to deform; the second occurs near the random close packing, and is characterized by gas migration in a fracture-like manner. We suggest that changes in gas migration behavior are caused by dilation of the granular network, which locally resists bubble growth. The resulting bubble deformation increases the likelihood of bubble coalescence, and promotes the development of permeable pathways at low porosities. This behavior may explain the efficient loss of volatiles from viscous slurries such as crystal-rich magmas.
published_date 2015-08-12T03:33:27Z
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