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Future proofing doctoral education in healthcare: An analysis of the PhD by published works.

Tessa Watts Orcid Logo, Tom Laws

International Networking for Healthcare Education Conference

Swansea University Author: Tessa Watts Orcid Logo

Abstract

This symposium focuses on changes in doctoral education brought on by universities attempts meet performance targets linked to funding. Specifically it brings together three interrelated papers to critically explore the benefits, challenges and quality assurance implications of the PhD by published...

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Published in: International Networking for Healthcare Education Conference
Published: 2015
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa23035
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Abstract: This symposium focuses on changes in doctoral education brought on by universities attempts meet performance targets linked to funding. Specifically it brings together three interrelated papers to critically explore the benefits, challenges and quality assurance implications of the PhD by published works. The international perspective of research education in health care will highlight main features of this trend in doctoral education. In terms of labour capital, it is widely acknowledged that doctoral education has a central role in the preparation of future scholars and leaders in research, policy, practice and education and in making important, original and substantial contributions to knowledge (McKenna, 2005; Rolfe and Davies, 2009). In health care practice and education, the rapid expansion of research and technology conjoined with the requirements for autonomous practitioners and advancing evidence-based practice support the need and demand for doctoral education (Cleary et al., 2011). In response, doctoral programmes for health professionals have proliferated internationally in recent decades. Contemporary candidates may be provided with a number of educational options that culminate in a PhD qualification. In addition to the traditional genre of PhD by independent research, routes to doctoral qualification now include genres of taught and professional doctorates and the PhD by published works. Within each of these genres a diverse range of programmes exist. While there is a burgeoning international literature on doctoral programmes in general (see, for example, Boud and Lee, 2009; Powell and Green, 2007; Park, 2005) and in nursing and healthcare specifically (see, for example Rolfe and Davies, 2009; Brown Benedict, 2008; Kirkman et al., 2007), the focus to date has primarily been limited to exploring traditional PhD and professional doctorates. Published works are integral to the PhD award of many Northern European universities. Yet with the exception of a small body of work, mainly Australian, to date little attention has been afforded to this genre of PhD route. Nevertheless it has been argued that this route to the PhD award offers significant advantages to students; supervisors, institutions and also professional disciplines and practice (see, for example, Pickering and Byrne, 2014; Jackson, 2013; Francis et al., 2009). Accordingly this symposium seeks to critically explore the doctoral route of PhD by published works in health-care education. The objectives of the symposium are to:•Critically explore the drivers for, current and future challenges confronting doctoral level education in health care;•Share reflections on the experiences of undertaking and supervising the PhD by published works in Australia and the United Kingdom;•Discuss significant quality issues in thesis construction and assessment.
Keywords: Doctorates Publication Quality Assurance Student experience Assessment
College: College of Human and Health Sciences